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2017 Word of the Year

absolutely

[ab-suh-loot-lee, ab-suh-loot-] /ˌæb səˈlut li, ˈæb səˌlut-/
adverb
1.
without exception; completely; wholly; entirely:
You are absolutely right.
2.
positively; certainly.
3.
(of a transitive verb) without an object.
interjection
4.
(used emphatically to express complete agreement or unqualified assent):
Do you think it will work? Absolutely!
Origin of absolutely
1525-1535
First recorded in 1525-35; absolute + -ly
Synonyms
1. totally, unqualifiedly. 2. unquestionably, unequivocally, definitely.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for absolutely
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I have absolutely refused the latter, let what will (as I have told her) be the consequence.

    Clarissa, Volume 1 (of 9) Samuel Richardson
  • And I declare to you, that I know not my own heart, if it not be absolutely free.

    Clarissa, Volume 1 (of 9) Samuel Richardson
  • Thackeray thought that it had "absolutely stopped" the sale.

  • The ability to love cleanly and absolutely is the supreme virtue.

    Within the Law Marvin Dana
  • It has absolutely nothing to do with the rest of you, or with our schemes for money-making.

    Within the Law Marvin Dana
British Dictionary definitions for absolutely

absolutely

/ˌæbsəˈluːtlɪ/
adverb
1.
in an absolute manner, esp completely or perfectly
sentence substitute
2.
yes; certainly; unquestionably
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for absolutely
adv.

late 14c., "unconditionally, completely," from absolute (adj.) + -ly (2). From mid-15c. as "without reference to anything else, not relatively;" meaning "to the utmost degree" emerged by mid-16c. As a colloquial emphatic in American English, it is attested from 1892.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Nearby words for absolutely

Word Value for absolutely

15
18
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