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admire

[ad-mahyuh r] /ædˈmaɪər/
verb (used with object), admired, admiring.
1.
to regard with wonder, pleasure, or approval.
2.
to regard with wonder or surprise (usually used ironically or sarcastically):
I admire your audacity.
verb (used without object), admired, admiring.
3.
to feel or express admiration.
4.
Dialect. to take pleasure; like or desire:
I would admire to go.
Idioms
5.
be admiring of, Chiefly South Midland and Southern U.S. to admire:
He's admiring of his brother's farm.
Origin of admire
1580-1590
1580-90; < Latin admīrārī, equivalent to ad- ad- + mīrārī (in Medieval Latin mīrāre) to wonder at, admire
Related forms
admirer, noun
preadmire, verb (used with object), preadmired, preadmiring.
preadmirer, noun
quasi-admire, verb, quasi-admired, quasi-admiring.
unadmired, adjective
Synonyms
1. esteem, revere, venerate.
Antonyms
1. despise.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for admire
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Mr. Paine did not admire Mrs. Davis, and was not likely to be influenced by her prejudices.

    Brave and Bold Horatio Alger
  • Then you will understand, and understanding, you will admire his courage.

    Ancient Man Hendrik Willem van Loon
  • It's a good bluff, as I said before, and I admire the way you worked it.

    Way of the Lawless Max Brand
  • I admire him—you'd have to see him in the hospital, with every one deferring to him and all that, to understand.

    K Mary Roberts Rinehart
  • True, Shakespeare was not the kind of man Englishmen are accustomed to admire.

    The Man Shakespeare Frank Harris
British Dictionary definitions for admire

admire

/ədˈmaɪə/
verb (transitive)
1.
to regard with esteem, respect, approval, or pleased surprise
2.
(archaic) to wonder at
Derived Forms
admirer, noun
admiring, adjective
admiringly, adverb
Word Origin
C16: from Latin admīrāri to wonder at, from ad- to, at + mīrāri to wonder, from mīrus wonderful
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for admire
v.

early 15c. (implied in admired), from Middle French admirer (Old French amirer, 14c.), or directly from Latin admirari "to wonder at" (see admiration). Related: Admiring; admiringly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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