Try Our Apps
Dictionary.com

follow Dictionary.com

2017 Word of the Year

adrift

[uh-drift] /əˈdrɪft/
adjective, adverb
1.
floating without control; drifting; not anchored or moored:
The survivors were adrift in the rowboat for three days.
2.
lacking aim, direction, or stability.
Origin of adrift
1615-1625
First recorded in 1615-25; a-1 + drift
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for adrift
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • But we were afraid to lose sight of the bridge, lest we should get all adrift.

    Ned Myers James Fenimore Cooper
  • "I think if I were up there I'd cut us adrift," said Stanley grimly.

  • Then she introduced her daughter to Drake and sent them adrift through the rooms.

    The Christian Hall Caine
  • We'd be adrift and out of sight of land if Mary-'Gusta went away.

    Mary-'Gusta Joseph C. Lincoln
  • Have a civil tongue, then, and don't provoke me to turn you adrift on the world.

    One Of Them Charles James Lever
British Dictionary definitions for adrift

adrift

/əˈdrɪft/
adjective, adverb (postpositive)
1.
floating without steering or mooring; drifting
2.
without purpose; aimless
3.
(informal) off course or amiss: the project went adrift
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for adrift
adv.

1620s, from a- (1) "on" + drift. Figurative use by 1680s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Nearby words for adrift

Word Value for adrift

10
10
Scrabble Words With Friends