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afeard

or afeared

[uh-feerd] /əˈfɪərd/
adjective, British and Midland and Southern U.S.
1.
Origin of afeard
1000
before 1000; Middle English afered, Old English āfǣred frightened (past participle of āfǣran). See a-3, fear, -ed2
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for afeared
Historical Examples
  • You're afeared to go to law—Levi West—you try th' law—and see how ye like it.

  • He didn't like to lind, an' he was afeared to say No, an' he was in a quondairy intirely.

    Ireland as It Is Robert John Buckley (AKA R.J.B.)
  • I used to be afeared when I thought on it, but now—I think I could die and be happy!

    The Rambles of a Rat

    A. L. O. E.
  • I am afeared, Sir Thomas, you shall find it hard matter to deal with him.

    Clare Avery Emily Sarah Holt
  • “I am afeared, Sister, we have no crisping-pins,” said Clare.

    Clare Avery Emily Sarah Holt
  • There's a big tear in my shoulder, an' I'm afeared I've made my last cruise.

    Frank Merriwell Down South Burt L. Standish
  • Well, all I can say is, I never seen you afeared to go to say before.

  • "I'm afeared, then, I won't be able to claim that there money," he said forlornly.

    From Place to Place

    Irvin S. Cobb
  • "She's afeared the lawyer suspects her virtue," Edith said to herself.

    The Art of Disappearing John Talbot Smith
  • I'm afeared of what d'you call 'ems, some tomfoolery, you know.

    The Power of Darkness Leo Tolstoy
British Dictionary definitions for afeared

afeard

/əˈfɪəd/
adjective
1.
(postpositive) an archaic or dialect word for afraid
Word Origin
Old English āfǣred, from afǣran to frighten, from fǣran to fear
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for afeared
adj.

Old English afæred, past participle of now-obsolete afear (Old English afæran) "to terrify," from a- (1) + root of fear. Used frequently by Shakespeare, but supplanted in literary English after 1700 by afraid (q.v.). It still survives in popular and colloquial speech.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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11
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