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afternoons

[af-ter-noonz, ahf-] /ˌæf tərˈnunz, ˌɑf-/
adverb
1.
in or during any or every afternoon:
He slept late and worked afternoons.
Origin of afternoons
1895-1900
1895-1900, Americanism; afternoon + -s1

afternoon

[noun af-ter-noon, ahf-; adjective af-ter-noon, ahf-, af-, ahf-] /noun ˌæf tərˈnun, ˌɑf-; adjective ˈæf tərˈnun, ˈɑf-, ˌæf-, ˌɑf-/
noun
1.
the time from noon until evening.
2.
the latter part:
the afternoon of life.
adjective
3.
pertaining to the latter part of the day.
Origin
Middle English word dating back to 1250-1300; See origin at after, noon
Related forms
preafternoon, noun, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for afternoons
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I'm to be in your office in the mornings, Dr. Wilson, and anywhere I am needed in the afternoons.

    K Mary Roberts Rinehart
  • On the afternoons when Coupeau felt dull, he would call on the Lorilleuxs.

    L'Assommoir Emile Zola
  • In the afternoons he would take a walk if the weather was nice.

    L'Assommoir Emile Zola
  • That is where we play—I mean it is most pleasant there, hot afternoons.

    The Very Small Person Annie Hamilton Donnell
  • But he rather liked to visit the graveyard on Sunday afternoons.

    Cy Whittaker's Place Joseph C. Lincoln
British Dictionary definitions for afternoons

afternoons

/ˌɑːftəˈnuːnz/
adverb
1.
(informal) during the afternoon, esp regularly

afternoon

/ˌɑːftəˈnuːn/
noun
1.
  1. the period of the day between noon and evening
  2. (as modifier): afternoon tea
2.
a middle or later part: the afternoon of life
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for afternoons

afternoon

n.

c.1300, from after + noon. In 15c.-16c., the form was at afternoon; from c.1600 it has been in the afternoon. Middle English also had aftermete "afternoon, part of the day following the noon meal," mid-14c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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13
15
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