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allure1

[uh-loo r]
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verb (used with object), al·lured, al·lur·ing.
  1. to attract or tempt by something flattering or desirable.
  2. to fascinate; charm.
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verb (used without object), al·lured, al·lur·ing.
  1. to be attractive or tempting.
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noun
  1. fascination; charm; appeal.
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Origin of allure1

1375–1425; late Middle English aluren < Middle French alurer, equivalent to a- a-5 + lurer to lure
Related formsal·lur·er, nounun·al·lured, adjective

Synonyms

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1. entice, lure. 2. enchant, entrance, captivate. 4. glamor, attraction.

allure2

[al-yoo r, -yer]
noun
  1. alure.
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alure

or al·lure

[al-yoo r, -yer]
noun
  1. a passageway, as the walk along one side of a cloister.
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Origin of alure

1250–1300; Middle English, also al(o)ur < Old French aleure passage, equivalent to ale walk (see alley1) + -ure -ure
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for allure

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • Now it assembles the blossoms of a whole long year to bewilder and allure.

    The Spenders

    Harry Leon Wilson

  • The table was spread in a manner to engage the eye and allure the appetite.

    Imogen

    William Godwin

  • Thus: in that by guile they allure the people to the lust of the flesh.

  • He has eliminated the subtle sensuousness which has its own allure in the drawing.

    Holbein

    Beatrice Fortescue

  • It is far better to allure them, by showing them the pleasures of doing right.

    The Teacher

    Jacob Abbott


British Dictionary definitions for allure

allure

verb
  1. (tr) to entice or tempt (someone) to a person or place or to a course of action; attract
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noun
  1. attractiveness; appealthe cottage's allure was its isolation
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Derived Formsallurement, nounallurer, noun

Word Origin

C15: from Old French alurer, from lure bait, lure
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for allure

v.

c.1400, from Anglo-French alurer, Old French aleurer "to attract, captivate; train a falcon to hunt," from à "to" (see ad-) + loirre "falconer's lure," from a Frankish word (see lure), perhaps influenced by French allure "gait, way of walking." Related: Allured; alluring. The noun is first attested 1540s; properly this sense is allurement.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper