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[ahng-gleyz, -glez] /ɑŋˈgleɪz, -ˈglɛz/
an old English country-dance.
a dance form in quick duple time, occasionally constituting part of an 18th-century instrumental suite.
Origin of anglaise
< French, feminine of anglais English Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for anglaise
Historical Examples
  • La petite anglaise and Marie Hazard did as the others did: and here is the whole history.

    The Secret of Charlotte Bront Frederika Macdonald
  • Strictly speaking, Daniel Cooper was one figure of the anglaise.

    War and Peace Leo Tolstoy
  • And an old woman comes up and says in French, 'Madame est anglaise?'

    Mrs. Warren's Daughter Sir Harry Johnston
  • "Perhaps the miladi anglaise might give up one of her rooms for dis one," debated the hostess, bustling away to ask.

  • Madame was too charitable to criticise, but I think she regarded the jeune fille anglaise as unbecomingly emancipated.

    A Padre in France George A. Birmingham
  • I must have made miles of "open-work" (the modern broderie anglaise, only better) for underclothes, first and last.

    The Retrospect Ada Cambridge
  • And then she was eccentric, eccentric in cold blood; she was an anglaise, after all.

    The American Henry James
  • "Don't urge her; she may change her mind and go with you," dryly remarked anglaise with back towards us as she dusted the mantel.

  • He turned round, probably to quiz la belle anglaise he expected to behold.

  • What he had mainly in mind was to say to the old actress that she had been mistaken—the jeune anglaise wasn't such a grue.

    The Tragic Muse Henry James

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