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arris

[ar-is] /ˈær ɪs/
noun, Architecture.
1.
a sharp ridge, as between adjoining channels of a Doric column.
2.
the line, ridge, or hip formed by the meeting of two surfaces at an exterior angle.
Also called piend.
Origin of arris
1670-1680
1670-80; < Middle French areste; see arête
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for arrises
Historical Examples
  • When the work will permit, it is desirable to round the arrises to about a ⅜-in.

    Concrete Construction Halbert P. Gillette
  • After this, the arrises may again be planed until it has 16 and then 32 sides.

    Mission Furniture H. H. Windsor
  • Much skill and care is required to retain the arrises sharp and the curved members of accurate and proportionate outline.

  • It is well to chamfer the arrises at the end of the tenon to insure its starting easily into the mortise.

    Handwork in Wood

    William Noyes
British Dictionary definitions for arrises

arris

/ˈærɪs/
noun (pl) -ris, -rises
1.
a sharp edge at the meeting of two surfaces at an angle with one another, as at two adjacent sides of a stone block
Word Origin
C17: apparently from Old French areste beard of grain, sharp ridge; see arête
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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7
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