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2017 Word of the Year

barefoot

[bair-foo t] /ˈbɛərˌfʊt/
adjective, adverb
1.
Also, barefooted. with the feet bare:
a barefoot boy; to walk barefoot.
2.
Carpentry. (of a post or stud) secured to a sill or the like without mortising.
Origin of barefoot
1000
before 1000; Middle English barfot, Old English bærfōt. See bare1, foot
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for barefoot
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • She was in rags, barefoot, like the poorest nomad of them all.

    A Spirit in Prison Robert Hichens
  • They like to walk about barefoot and have money in their stocking.

    Ireland as It Is Robert John Buckley (AKA R.J.B.)
  • "I wish she wouldn't go about barefoot," he added, with a tinge of jealousy.

    They of the High Trails

    Hamlin Garland
  • He was barefoot, but he wore a clean shirt of unbleached cotton, open at the neck.

    O Pioneers! Willa Cather
  • She was working in the garden when we got there, barefoot and ragged.

    My Antonia Willa Cather
British Dictionary definitions for barefoot

barefoot

/ˈbɛəˌfʊt/
adjective, adverb
1.
with the feet uncovered
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for barefoot
adj.

Old English bærfot; see bare (adj.) + foot (n.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Nearby words for barefoot

Word Value for barefoot

13
14
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