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beamish

[bee-mish] /ˈbi mɪʃ/
adjective
1.
bright, cheerful, and optimistic.
Origin of beamish
1520-1530
1520-30; beam (noun) + -ish1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for beamish
Historical Examples
  • Apparently changing the subject, he said: "You know—or know of—Mrs. beamish, don't you?"

    The Paliser case Edgar Saltus
  • Paliser, in producing Mrs. beamish, had also produced the programme.

    The Paliser case Edgar Saltus
  • beamish will attend to everything for you—if you care to go.

    The Cross-Cut

    Courtney Ryley Cooper
  • "Confound that man Coburn," he heard Captain beamish mutter.

    The Pit Prop Syndicate Freeman Wills Crofts
  • Captain beamish is tall and strongly built, but I should not say he was stout.

    The Pit Prop Syndicate Freeman Wills Crofts
  • beamish replied politely and with a show of readiness and candor.

    The Pit Prop Syndicate Freeman Wills Crofts
  • beamish, the manager explained, was there and wished to speak to Archer.

    The Pit Prop Syndicate Freeman Wills Crofts
  • Then beamish handed the other a paper, presumably Madeleine's letter.

    The Pit Prop Syndicate Freeman Wills Crofts
  • "Righto," beamish answered shortly, and the conversation ended.

    The Pit Prop Syndicate Freeman Wills Crofts
  • Consternation showed on every face, and beamish swore bitterly.

    The Pit Prop Syndicate Freeman Wills Crofts
Word Origin and History for beamish
adj.

1530 (Palsgrave), from beam + -ish. Lewis Carroll may have thought he was inventing it in "Jabberwocky."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for beamish

14
15
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