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7 Cycling Words

bedraggled

[bih-drag-uh ld] /bɪˈdræg əld/
adjective
1.
limp and soiled, as with rain or dirt.
Origin of bedraggled
Related forms
unbedraggled, adjective

bedraggle

[bih-drag-uh l] /bɪˈdræg əl/
verb (used with object), bedraggled, bedraggling.
1.
to make limp and soiled, as with rain or dirt.
Origin
1720-30; be- + draggle
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for bedraggled
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • It was the grim resolution of a bent, bedraggled, but unbroken pride.

    Sister Carrie Theodore Dreiser
  • It was not bedraggled, so it had fallen recently, as the winds had not beaten it about.

    The Eyes of the Woods Joseph A. Altsheler
  • The 'large white plumes' that dance before the eyes of youth soil, and are bedraggled.

    A Certain Rich Man William Allen White
  • I'm glad there's nobody but this old man to see me in this bedraggled bonnet.

    The Old Tobacco Shop William Bowen
  • He was bound to her, he was leashed to her, and he must go begrimed and bedraggled to the dregs of life with her.

    The Bondman Hall Caine
British Dictionary definitions for bedraggled

bedraggled

/bɪˈdræɡəld/
adjective
1.
(of hair, clothing, etc) limp, untidy, or dirty, as with rain or mud

bedraggle

/bɪˈdræɡəl/
verb
1.
(transitive) to make (hair, clothing, etc) limp, untidy, or dirty, as with rain or mud
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for bedraggled
adj.

1727, past participle adjective from bedraggle.

bedraggle

v.

1727, from be- + draggle, frequentative of drag.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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