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blague

/blɑːɡ/
noun
1.
pretentious but empty talk; nonsense
Derived Forms
blaguer, noun
Word Origin
C19: from French
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Examples from the Web for blague
Historical Examples
  • Once caught by the blague of this misery, Germinie could not cut loose from it.

    Germinie Lacerteux Edmond and Jules de Goncourt
  • On this occasion he was only attended by Careless and Colonel blague.

    Boscobel: or, the royal oak William Harrison Ainsworth
  • And what blague, what calling for coffee pour le petit Whistler, pour notre petit Amricain!

    The Life of James McNeill Whistler Elizabeth Robins Pennell
  • From blague comes the verb blaguer, which the same authority says means "dire des blagues; mentir pour le plaisir de mentir."

  • With this specimen of blague we may leave the caricaturists of France to fight it out with La Censure.

  • He regarded all public demonstration as blague, and later in life carried this attitude into politics.

    Modern Painting, Its Tendency and Meaning Willard Huntington Wright
  • blague eventually escaped, and so the George found its way to the king in France.

  • But there is a joyous quality to the San Francisco blague which sets it apart, even in the West.

    The Native Son Inez Haynes Irwin
  • The old Victorian and pre-Victorian blague word "petticoat" had been revived in Fred's vocabulary, and in others, as "skirt."

    Ramsey Milholland Booth Tarkington
  • The play is full of a blague now slightly outmoded, but the types remain eternally true—those of the Parisian triangle.

    Iconoclasts

    James Huneker

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