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boggle1

[bog-uh l] /ˈbɒg əl/
verb (used with object), boggled, boggling.
1.
to overwhelm or bewilder, as with the magnitude, complexity, or abnormality of:
The speed of light boggles the mind.
2.
to bungle; botch.
verb (used without object), boggled, boggling.
3.
to hesitate or waver because of scruples, fear, etc.
4.
to start or jump with fear, alarm, or surprise; shrink; shy.
5.
to bungle awkwardly.
6.
to be overwhelmed or bewildered.
noun
7.
an act of shying or taking alarm.
8.
a scruple; demur; hesitation.
9.
bungle; botch.
Origin of boggle1
1590-1600
First recorded in 1590-1600; perhaps from boggle2
Related forms
bogglingly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for boggled
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • He boggled slightly as he came to the "adjective," but got over it safely.

  • Ludovic boggled horribly at this; but they accorded at last.

    Little Novels of Italy Maurice Henry Hewlett
  • I am above concealing my sentiments, though I have boggled at uttering them.

    Mary Wollstonecraft Elizabeth Robins Pennell
  • When she had gone on to explain, The Guesser's mind had boggled at her audacity—at first.

    But, I Don't Think Gordon Randall Garrett
  • First of all you were going to marry the widow; you boggled that.

    Roger Ingleton, Minor Talbot Baines Reed
  • I boggled about it at first, and thought it was a regular blind lead.

    The Peril Finders George Manville Fenn
  • But he boggled when the boys appeared with cases of dynamite on their shoulder.

    The Flaming Mountain Harold Leland Goodwin
  • Kern boggled a good deal over the answer to this, but finally got it out.

    V. V.'s Eyes

    Henry Sydnor Harrison
British Dictionary definitions for boggled

boggle

/ˈbɒɡəl/
verb (intransitive) often foll by at
1.
to be surprised, confused, or alarmed (esp in the phrase the mind boggles)
2.
to hesitate or be evasive when confronted with a problem
3.
(transitive) to baffle; bewilder; puzzle
Word Origin
C16: probably variant of bogle1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for boggled

boggle

v.

1590s, "to start with fright" (as a startled horse does), from Middle English bugge "specter" (among other things, supposed to scare horses at night); see bug (n.); also cf. bogey (n.1). The meaning "to raise scruples, hesitate" is from 1630s. Related: Boggled; boggling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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12
16
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