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bride1

[brahyd]
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noun
  1. a newly married woman or a woman about to be married.

Origin of bride1

before 1000; Middle English; Old English brȳd; cognate with Dutch bruid, German Braut, Old Norse brūthr, Gothic brūths
Related formsbride·less, adjectivebride·like, adjective

bride2

[brahyd; French breed]
noun
  1. Also called bar, leg, tie. a connection consisting of a thread or a number of threads for joining various solid parts of a design in needlepoint lace.
  2. an ornamental bonnet string.

Origin of bride2

1865–70; < French: bonnet-string, bridle, Old French < Germanic; see bridle

Bride

[brahyd]
noun
  1. Saint. Brigid, Saint.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for bride

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • You haven't seen the bride's table in the tent yet, have you, Hippy?

  • There was no lessening of the bride's composure as she replied, with a little shrug.

    Within the Law

    Marvin Dana

  • "No," the bride replied, and there was determination in the monosyllable.

    Within the Law

    Marvin Dana

  • Since then, he had striven to obtain another interview with his bride, but she had refused him.

    Within the Law

    Marvin Dana

  • No well-regulated Thames inn can exist a week without a bride and groom.

    The Underdog

    F. Hopkinson Smith


British Dictionary definitions for bride

bride1

noun
  1. a woman who has just been or is about to be married

Word Origin

Old English brӯd; related to Old Norse brūthr, Gothic brūths daughter-in-law, Old High German brūt

bride2

noun
  1. lacemaking needlework a thread or loop that joins parts of a patternAlso called: bar

Word Origin

C19: from French, literally: bridle, probably of Germanic origin

Bride

noun
  1. Saint Bride See Bridget (def. 1)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for bride

n.

Old English bryd "bride, betrothed or newly married woman," from Proto-Germanic *bruthiz "woman being married" (cf. Old Frisian breid, Dutch bruid, Old High German brut, German Braut "bride"). Gothic cognate bruþs, however, meant "daughter-in-law," and the form of the word borrowed from Old High German into Medieval Latin (bruta) and Old French (bruy) had only this sense. In ancient Indo-European custom, the married woman went to live with her husband's family, so the only "newly wed female" in such a household would have been the daughter-in-law. On the same notion, some trace the word itself to the PIE verbal root *bru- "to cook, brew, make broth," as this likely was the daughter-in-law's job.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with bride

bride

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.