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camomile

[kam-uh-mahyl, -meel] /ˈkæm əˌmaɪl, -ˌmil/
noun
1.

chamomile

or camomile

[kam-uh-mahyl, -meel] /ˈkæm əˌmaɪl, -ˌmil/
noun
1.
a composite plant, Chamaemelium nobile (or Anthemis nobilis), native to the Old World, having strongly scented foliage and white ray flowers with yellow centers used medicinally and as a tea.
2.
any of several allied plants of the genera Matricaria and Tripleurospermum.
Origin of chamomile
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English camamyll, camomille < Middle French, Old French camomille or Medieval Latin camomilla, for Latin chamaemēlon < Greek chamaímēlon, equivalent to chamaí on the ground + mêlon apple; allegedly so called from the applelike odor of the flowers
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for camomile
Historical Examples
  • He was carrying, insecurely, a jug of poppy-head and camomile, which had been prescribed as a lotion.

    The Manxman Hall Caine
  • Give it brimstone and treacle and a cupful of wormwood and camomile.

    The Manxman Hall Caine
  • I have some camomile leaves, and I will make the infusion while you wait downstairs.'

    Stradella F(rancis) Marion Crawford
  • Many weeds seem to be like "The camomile, the more it is trodden the more it grows."

    In Pastures Green Peter McArthur
  • camomile tea is generally supposed to be good for the nerves.

    December Love Robert Hichens
  • A certain remedy is said to have been discovered in the camomile.

    Soil Culture J. H. Walden
  • What you need is a good dose of camomile tea to tone you up.

    Rebecca Mary Annie Hamilton Donnell
  • On my honour and conscience, what else but the millionth part of a drop of camomile oil?

    The Village Notary Jzsef Etvs
  • Both maythen (camomile) and wild lettuce were used for the eyes.

    The Old English Herbals Eleanour Sinclair Rohde
  • Where it lay fallow it was entirely hidden by a bed of grass and camomile.

    The Lands of the Saracen Bayard Taylor
British Dictionary definitions for camomile

camomile

/ˈkæməˌmaɪl/
noun
1.
any aromatic plant of the Eurasian genus Anthemis, esp A. nobilis, whose finely dissected leaves and daisy-like flowers are used medicinally: family Asteraceae (composites)
2.
any plant of the related genus Matricaria, esp M. chamomilla (German or wild camomile)
3.
camomile tea, a medicinal beverage made from the fragrant leaves and flowers of any of these plants
Word Origin
C14: from Old French camomille, from Medieval Latin chamomilla, from Greek khamaimēlon, literally, earth-apple (referring to the apple-like scent of the flowers)

chamomile

/ˈkæməˌmaɪl/
noun
1.
a variant spelling of camomile
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for camomile
n.

mid-13c., from Old French camemile, from Late Latin camomilla, from Latin chamomilla, from Greek chamaimelon, literally "earth apple," from chamai "on the ground" (also "dwarf;" see chameleon) + melon "apple" (see malic). So called for its scent. Old English had it as camemalon.

chamomile

n.

obsolete form of camomile.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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14
18
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