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cent

[sent]
See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. a bronze coin of the U.S., the 100th part of a U.S. dollar: made of steel during part of 1943. Symbol: ¢
  2. the 100th part of the monetary units of various other nations, including Australia, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Brunei, Canada, Ethiopia, Fiji, Guyana, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Kenya, Liberia, Mauritius, New Zealand, the Seychelles, Sierra Leone, the Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Tanzania, Trinidad and Tobago, and Uganda.
  3. a monetary unit of certain European Union countries, the 100th part of a euro.
  4. sen3.

Origin of cent

1325–75; Middle English < Latin centēsimus hundredth (by shortening), equivalent to cent(um) 100 (see hundred) + -ēsimus ordinal suffix
Can be confusedcents scents sense

cent-

  1. variant of centi- before a vowel: centare.

cent.

  1. centigrade.
  2. central.
  3. centum.
  4. century.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for cent

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • "We don't scare worth a cent," she snapped, with the virulence of a vixen.

    Within the Law

    Marvin Dana

  • I gits half eat by that crazy skate, an' fired without a cent fer it.

    Thoroughbreds

    W. A. Fraser

  • What he gits for fixin' the mill ain't nothin' to me—I don't git a cent on it.

    The Underdog

    F. Hopkinson Smith

  • Yes, Martin Wade might leave her but all his property must be left behind—every cent of it.

    Dust

    Mr. and Mrs. Haldeman-Julius

  • "Not a cent," says selfish Prudence; and I drop it from my fingers.

    Yankee Gypsies

    John Greenleaf Whittier


British Dictionary definitions for cent

cent

noun
  1. a monetary unit of American Samoa, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Australia, Austria, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Bermuda, Bosnia-Hercegovina, Brunei, Canada, the Cayman Islands, Cyprus, Dominica, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, France, French Guiana, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guam, Guyana, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Kenya, Kiribati, Kosovo, Liberia, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Malta, the Marshall Islands, Martinique, Mauritius, Mayotte, Micronesia, Monaco, Montenegro, Namibia, Nauru, the Netherlands, the Netherlands Antilles, New Zealand, the Northern Mariana Islands, Palau, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Réunion, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, the Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, the Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Surinam, Swaziland, Taiwan, Tanzania, Trinidad and Tobago, Tuvalu, Uganda, the United States, the Vatican City, the Virgin Islands, and Zimbabwe. It is worth one hundredth of their respective standard units
  2. an interval of pitch between two frequencies f 2 and f 1 equal to 3986.31 log (f 2 / f 1); one twelve-hundredth of the interval between two frequencies having the ratio 1:2 (an octave)

Word Origin

C16: from Latin centēsimus hundredth, from centum hundred
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for cent

n.

late 14c., from Latin centum "hundred" (see hundred). Middle English meaning was "one hundred," but it shifted 17c. to "hundredth part" under influence of percent. Chosen in this sense in 1786 as a name for a U.S. currency unit by Continental Congress. The word first was suggested by Robert Morris in 1782 under a different currency plan. Before the cent, Revolutionary and colonial dollars were reckoned in ninetieths, based on the exchange rate of Pennsylvania money and Spanish coin.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with cent

cent

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.