Dictionary.com
definitions
  • synonyms

cite1

[sahyt]
See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
verb (used with object), cit·ed, cit·ing.
  1. to quote (a passage, book, author, etc.), especially as an authority: He cited the Constitution in his defense.
  2. to mention in support, proof, or confirmation; refer to as an example: He cited many instances of abuse of power.
  3. to summon officially or authoritatively to appear in court.
  4. to call to mind; recall: citing my gratitude to him.
  5. Military. to mention (a soldier, unit, etc.) in orders, as for gallantry.
  6. to commend, as for outstanding service, hard work, or devotion to duty.
  7. to summon or call; rouse to action.
Show More

Origin of cite1

1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin citāre to summon before a church court; in Latin, to hurry, set in motion, summon before a court, frequentative of ciēre to move, set in motion
Related formscit·a·ble, cite·a·ble, adjectivecit·er, nounnon·cit·a·ble, adjectivenon·cite·a·ble, adjectiveun·cit·a·ble, adjectiveun·cite·a·ble, adjectiveun·cit·ed, adjective
Can be confusedcite sight site
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for cited

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • Many harrowing details of the cruelties practiced were cited.

    The Grand Old Man

    Richard B. Cook

  • The career of Samuel Drew is not less remarkable than any of those which we have cited.

    Self-Help

    Samuel Smiles

  • On the contrary, instances might be cited where only one-half of one per cent.

    The Railroad Question

    William Larrabee

  • The Chicago, Iowa and Nebraska road may be cited as a fair illustration.

    The Railroad Question

    William Larrabee

  • An infinite number of similar discriminations might be cited.

    The Railroad Question

    William Larrabee


British Dictionary definitions for cited

cite

verb (tr)
  1. to quote or refer to (a passage, book, or author) in substantiation as an authority, proof, or example
  2. to mention or commend (a soldier, etc) for outstanding bravery or meritorious action
  3. to summon to appear before a court of law
  4. to enumeratehe cited the king's virtues
Show More
Derived Formscitable or citeable, adjectiveciter, noun

Word Origin

C15: from Old French citer to summon, from Latin citāre to rouse, from citus quick, from ciēre to excite
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for cited

cite

v.

mid-15c., "to summon," from Old French citer "to summon" (14c.), from Latin citare "to summon, urge, call; put in sudden motion, call forward; rouse, excite," frequentative of ciere "to move, set in motion, stir, rouse, call, invite" from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion, to move to and fro" (cf. Sanskrit cyavate "stirs himself, goes;" Greek kinein "to move, set in motion; change, stir up," kinymai "move myself;" Gothic haitan "call, be called;" Old English hatan "command, call"). Sense of "calling forth a passage of writing" is first attested 1530s. Related: Cited; citing.

Show More
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper