Try Our Apps
Dictionary.com

follow Dictionary.com

Is irregardless a word?

clamor1

[klam-er] /ˈklæm ər/
noun
1.
a loud uproar, as from a crowd of people:
the clamor of the crowd at the gates.
2.
a vehement expression of desire or dissatisfaction:
the clamor of the proponents of the law.
3.
popular outcry:
The senators could not ignore the clamor against higher taxation.
4.
any loud and continued noise:
the clamor of traffic; the clamor of birds and animals in the zoo.
verb (used without object)
5.
to make a clamor; raise an outcry.
verb (used with object)
6.
to drive, force, influence, etc., by clamoring:
The newspapers clamored him out of office.
7.
to utter noisily:
They clamored their demands at the meeting.
Also, especially British, clamour.
Origin of clamor1
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English clamor (< Anglo-French) < Latin, equivalent to clām- (see claim) + -or -or1; Middle English clamour < Middle French < Latin clāmōr- (stem of clāmor)
Related forms
clamorer, clamorist, noun
Synonyms
1. shouting. 2. vociferation. 4. See noise.
Usage note
See -our.

clamor2

[klam-er] /ˈklæm ər/
verb (used with object), Obsolete.
1.
to silence.
Origin
1605-15; perhaps spelling variant of clammer, obsolete variant of clamber in sense “to clutch,” hence “reduce to silence”
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for clamored
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • He clamored for action, for zealous scouting, and this orderly investigation by mere words was absolutely maddening.

  • Here at last was news that was news—for which the press of the country, and Europe, clamored.

    Land of the Burnt Thigh Edith Eudora Kohl
  • The thoughts within him clamored so that sometimes he feared she must be aware of them.

    Kildares of Storm Eleanor Mercein Kelly
  • She clamored for a divorce, but there were no grounds upon which to obtain it.

  • And he continued to cling and to dispute for his life with those who clamored for his death.

    South Sea Tales Jack London
Word Origin and History for clamored

clamor

n.

late 14c., from Old French clamor "call, cry, appeal, outcry" (12c., Modern French clameur), from Latin clamor "a shout, a loud call" (either friendly or hostile), from clamare "to cry out" (see claim (v.)).

v.

late 14c., from clamor (n.). Related: Clamored; clamoring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for clamor

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for clamored

13
16
Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for clamored