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clement

[klem-uh nt] /ˈklɛm ənt/
adjective
1.
mild or merciful in disposition or character; lenient; compassionate:
A clement judge reduced his sentence.
2.
(of the weather) mild or temperate; pleasant.
Origin of clement
late Middle English
1425-1475
1425-75; late Middle English (< Old French) < Latin clēment-, stem of clēmēns gentle, merciful
Related forms
clemently, adverb
overclement, adjective

Clement

[klem-uh nt] /ˈklɛm ənt/
noun
1.
a male given name.

Clement I

noun
1.
Saint (Clement of Rome) a.d. c30–c100, first of the Apostolic Fathers: pope 88?–97?

Clement II

noun
1.
(Suidger) died 1047, pope 1046–47.

Clement III

noun
1.
(Paolo Scolari) died 1191, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1187–91.

Clement IV

noun
1.
(Guy Foulques) died 1268, French ecclesiastic: pope 1265–68.

Clement V

noun
1.
(Bertrand de Got) 1264–1314, French ecclesiastic: pope 1305–14.

Clement VI

noun
1.
(Pierre Roger) 1291–1352, French ecclesiastic: pope 1342–52.

Clement VII

noun
1.
(Giulio de' Medici) 1478–1534, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1523–34 (nephew of Lorenzo de' Medici).

Clement VIII

noun
1.
(Ippolito Aldobrandini) 1536–1605, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1592–1605.

Clement IX

noun
1.
(Giulio Rospigliosi) 1600–69, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1667–69.

Clement X

noun
1.
(Emilio Altieri) 1590–1676, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1670–76.

Clement XI

noun
1.
(Giovanni Francesco Albani) 1649–1721, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1700–21.

Clement XII

noun
1.
(Lorenzo Corsini) 1652–1740, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1730–40.

Clement XIII

noun
1.
(Carlo della Torre Rezzonico) 1693–1769, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1758–69.

Clement XIV

noun
1.
(Giovanni Vincenzo Antonio Ganganelli; Lorenzo Ganganelli) 1705–74, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1769–74.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for clement
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • But this man, named clement, a banker from Peoria, had proved unworthy.

    The Forest Stewart Edward White
  • clement Austin saw the sudden change that had come over her countenance.

    Henry Dunbar M. E. Braddon
  • Those Sundays were pleasant days to clement and the girl whom he hoped to win for his wife.

    Henry Dunbar M. E. Braddon
  • After this, clement Austin told Margaret that he could be of no use to her.

    Henry Dunbar M. E. Braddon
  • clement Austin was scarcely less pale than Henry Dunbar himself.

    Henry Dunbar M. E. Braddon
British Dictionary definitions for clement

clement

/ˈklɛmənt/
adjective
1.
merciful
2.
(of the weather) mild
Derived Forms
clemently, adverb
Word Origin
C15: from Latin clēmēns mild; probably related to Greek klinein to lean

Clement I

/ˈklɛmənt/
noun
1.
Saint, called Clement of Rome. pope (?88–?97 ad). Feast day: Nov 23

Clement V

noun
1.
original name Bertrand de Got. ?1264–1314, pope (1305–14): removed the papal seat from Rome to Avignon in France (1309)

Clement VII

noun
1.
original name Giulio de' Medici. 1478–1534, pope (1523–34): refused to authorize the annulment of the marriage of Henry VIII of England to Catherine of Aragon (1533)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for clement
adj.

mid-15c., "mild," of persons (attested from early 13c. as a surname), from Old French clement, from Latin clementem (nominative clemens) "mild, placid, gentle" (see clemency). Of weather, 1620s. Taken as a name by several early popes and popular in England as a masculine given name from mid-12c., also in fem. form Clemence.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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