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cloying

[kloi-ing] /ˈklɔɪ ɪŋ/
adjective
1.
causing or tending to cause disgust or aversion through excess:
a perfume of cloying sweetness.
2.
overly ingratiating or sentimental.
Origin of cloying
1540-1550
First recorded in 1540-50; cloy + -ing2
Related forms
cloyingly, adverb
uncloying, adjective

cloy

[kloi] /klɔɪ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to weary by an excess of food, sweetness, pleasure, etc.; surfeit; satiate.
verb (used without object)
2.
to become uninteresting or distasteful through overabundance:
A diet of cake and candy soon cloys.
Origin
1350-1400; aphetic variant of Middle English acloyen < Middle French enclo(y)er < Late Latin inclāvāre to nail in, equivalent to in- in-2 + -clāvāre, verbal derivative of clāvus nail
Related forms
overcloy, verb (used with object)
uncloyed, adjective
Synonyms
1. glut, sate, bore.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for cloying
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Still the breeze delayed, and the fragrant odors of the woods were cloying.

    'Smiles' Eliot H. Robinson
  • So feeble and cloying is the venereal indulgence, if Love inspires it not.

  • The deliberate pathos, the cloying charm, did not seem to exist for Louise.

    Regiment of Women Clemence Dane
  • But there need be no fear of massed color in a field, as being ever gaudy or cloying.

    Old-Time Gardens Alice Morse Earle
  • It was of a full and penetrating sweetness, too keen and delicate to be cloying.

British Dictionary definitions for cloying

cloying

/ˈklɔɪɪŋ/
adjective
1.
initially pleasurable or sweet but wearying in excess
Derived Forms
cloyingly, adverb

cloy

/klɔɪ/
verb
1.
to make weary or cause weariness through an excess of something initially pleasurable or sweet
Word Origin
C14 (originally: to nail, hence, to obstruct): from earlier acloyen, from Old French encloer, from Medieval Latin inclavāre, from Latin clāvāre to nail, from clāvus a nail
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for cloying
adj.

1640s, present participle adjective from cloy (v.). Related: Cloyingly; cloyingness.

cloy

v.

"weary by too much, fill to loathing, surfeit," 1520s, from Middle English cloyen "hinder movement, encumber" (late 14c.), a shortening of accloyen (early 14c.), from Old French encloer "to fasten with a nail, grip, grasp," figuratively "to hinder, check, stop, curb," from Late Latin inclavare "drive a nail into a horse's foot when shoeing," from Latin clavus "a nail" (see slot (n.2)).

Accloye is a hurt that cometh of shooing, when a Smith driveth a nail in the quick, which make him to halt. [Edward Topsell, "The History of Four-footed Beasts," 1607]
The figurative meaning "fill to a satiety, overfill" is attested for accloy from late 14c. Related: Cloyed; cloying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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