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2017 Word of the Year

Clydesdale

[klahydz-deyl] /ˈklaɪdzˌdeɪl/
noun
1.
one of a Scottish breed of strong, hardy draft horses, having a feathering of long hairs along the backs of the legs.
Origin of Clydesdale
1780-1790
First recorded in 1780-90; after Clydesdale, Scotland
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for Clydesdale
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The chief stock was settled at Liberton, in the upper part of Clydesdale.

    The Grand Old Man Richard B. Cook
  • His last-sabbath he preached (with Mr. Cargil in Clydesdale) on Psal.

  • You and Mrs. Clydesdale can remain here to-night if you wish.

    The Business of Life Robert W. Chambers
  • Clydesdale had descended to the drive and was conferring with the chauffeur.

    The Business of Life Robert W. Chambers
  • Clydesdale put her into the limousine and then got in after her.

    The Business of Life Robert W. Chambers
  • Kindness to people is also a Clydesdale tradition—isn't it, James?

    The Business of Life Robert W. Chambers
  • Then I am afraid that Mr. Clydesdale will have him arrested.

    The Business of Life Robert W. Chambers
  • And if Mr. Clydesdale comes in, say to him that I have gone to the doctor's.

    The Business of Life Robert W. Chambers
  • "You'll stop and lunch with us," said Clydesdale, filling two glasses.

    The Business of Life Robert W. Chambers
British Dictionary definitions for Clydesdale

Clydesdale

/ˈklaɪdzˌdeɪl/
noun
1.
a heavy powerful breed of carthorse, originally from Scotland
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for Clydesdale

"breed of heavy draught horses," 1786, so called because they were bred in the valley of the Clyde in Scotland. The river name is perhaps literally "cleansing," from a Celtic root akin to Latin cloaca (see cloaca).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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