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cognate

[kog-neyt] /ˈkɒg neɪt/
adjective
1.
related by birth; of the same parentage, descent, etc.
2.
Linguistics. descended from the same language or form:
such cognate languages as French and Spanish.
3.
allied or similar in nature or quality.
noun
4.
a person or thing cognate with another.
5.
a cognate word:
The English word cold is a cognate of German kalt.
Origin of cognate
1635-1645
1635-45; < Latin cognātus, equivalent to co- co- + -gnātus (past participle of gnāscī, nāscī to be born)
Related forms
cognateness, noun
cognatic
[kog-nat-ik] /kɒgˈnæt ɪk/ (Show IPA),
adjective
noncognate, adjective, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for cognate
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The young men who figure at embassies and missions are all "cognate numbers."

    The Fortunes Of Glencore Charles James Lever
  • The adverbial sense to be wholly transferred to the cognate word.

    The Verbalist Thomas Embly Osmun, (AKA Alfred Ayres)
  • The first syllable is cognate with mare and the second means servant.

    The Romance of Names

    Ernest Weekley
  • Richier, has generally been absorbed by the cognate Richard.

    The Romance of Names

    Ernest Weekley
  • A glade or valley in the wood was called a Dean, Dene, Denne, cognate with den.

    The Romance of Names

    Ernest Weekley
  • The bank of a river or lake was called Over, cognate with Ger.

    The Romance of Names

    Ernest Weekley
  • Stout, valiant, now used euphemistically for fat, is cognate with Ger.

    The Romance of Names

    Ernest Weekley
  • With bird nicknames may be mentioned Callow, unfledged, cognate with Lat.

    The Romance of Names

    Ernest Weekley
  • That the Greek mind was apt in doing this is cognate to their idealizing turn in art.

British Dictionary definitions for cognate

cognate

/ˈkɒɡneɪt/
adjective
1.
akin; related: cognate languages
2.
related by blood or descended from a common maternal ancestor Compare agnate
3.
(grammar) cognate object, a noun functioning as the object of a verb to which it is etymologically related, as in think a thought or sing a song
noun
4.
something that is cognate with something else
Derived Forms
cognately, adverb
cognateness, noun
cognation, noun
Word Origin
C17: from Latin cognātus, from co- same + gnātus born, variant of nātus, past participle of nāscī to be born
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for cognate
adj.

1640s, from Latin cognatus "of common descent," from com- "together" (see co-) + gnatus, past participle of gnasci, older form of nasci "to be born" (see genus). Words that are cognates are cousins, not siblings. As a noun, from 1754.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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10
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