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concoct

[kon-kokt, kuh n-] /kɒnˈkɒkt, kən-/
verb (used with object)
1.
to prepare or make by combining ingredients, especially in cookery:
to concoct a meal from leftovers.
2.
to devise; make up; contrive:
to concoct an excuse.
Origin of concoct
1525-1535
1525-35; < Latin concoctus (past participle of concoquere to cook together), equivalent to con- con- + coc-, variant stem of coquere to boil, cook1 (akin to Greek péptein; see pepsin, peptic) + -tus past participle ending
Related forms
concocter, concoctor, noun
concoctive, adjective
well-concocted, adjective
Synonyms
2. invent, fabricate, hatch.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for concocted
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • It was concocted between them, he said; not by one more than by another.

    The Channings Mrs. Henry Wood
  • She had concocted this scene in the carriage, and nothing should baulk her of it.

  • It is the most precious poison that ever was concocted in this world.

  • The idea had come to him that Paliser had concocted the admission.

    The Paliser case Edgar Saltus
  • More than likely Songbird has concocted some verses about it.

    The Rover Boys on the Farm Arthur M. Winfield (AKA Edward Stratemeyer)
British Dictionary definitions for concocted

concoct

/kənˈkɒkt/
verb (transitive)
1.
to make by combining different ingredients
2.
to invent; make up; contrive
Derived Forms
concocter, concoctor, noun
concoctive, adjective
Word Origin
C16: from Latin concoctus cooked together, from concoquere, from coquere to cook
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for concocted

concoct

v.

1530s, "to digest," from Latin concoctus, past participle of concoquere "to digest; to boil together, prepare; to consider well," from com- "together" (see com-) + coquere "to cook" (see cook (n.)). Meaning "to prepare an edible thing" is from 1670s. First expanded metaphorically beyond cooking 1792. Related: Concocted; concocting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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