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confide

[kuh n-fahyd] /kənˈfaɪd/
verb (used without object), confided, confiding.
1.
to impart secrets trustfully; discuss private matters or problems (usually followed by in):
She confides in no one but her husband.
2.
to have full trust; have faith:
They confided in their own ability.
verb (used with object), confided, confiding.
3.
to tell in assurance of secrecy:
He confided all his plans to her.
4.
to entrust; commit to the charge or knowledge of another:
She confided her jewelry to her sister.
Origin of confide
1625-1635
1625-35; < Latin confīdere, equivalent to con- con- + fīdere to trust, akin to foedus; see confederate, fidelity
Related forms
confider, noun
preconfide, verb, preconfided, preconfiding.
unconfided, adjective
well-confided, adjective
Synonyms
3. disclose, reveal, divulge, impart.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for confide
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I'll give you my word of honor to keep any secret you confide to me.

    Her Father's Daughter Gene Stratton-Porter
  • Besides, it is a privilege and pleasure to confide in my Little Dorrit.

    Little Dorrit Charles Dickens
  • The happiness of being able to talk about it, and to confide their happiness to each other!

  • Our customers over there, seem not to be able to confide their property to us fast enough.

    A Tale of Two Cities Charles Dickens
  • The deed was not then accomplished, neither did he confide in me.

    A Tale of Two Cities Charles Dickens
British Dictionary definitions for confide

confide

/kənˈfaɪd/
verb
1.
usually foll by in; when tr, may take a clause as object. to disclose (secret or personal matters) in confidence (to); reveal in private (to)
2.
(intransitive) foll by in. to have complete trust
3.
(transitive) to entrust into another's keeping
Derived Forms
confider, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Latin confīdere, from fīdere to trust; related to Latin foedus treaty
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for confide
v.

mid-15c., "to trust or have faith," from Latin confidere "to trust in, rely firmly upon, believe" (see confidence). Meaning "to share a secret with" is from 1735; phrase confide in (someone) is from 1888. Related: Confided; confiding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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13
15
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