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cram

[kram] /kræm/
verb (used with object), crammed, cramming.
1.
to fill (something) by force with more than it can easily hold.
2.
to force or stuff (usually followed by into, down, etc.).
3.
to fill with or as with an excessive amount of food; overfeed.
4.
Informal.
  1. to prepare (a person), as for an examination, by having him or her memorize information within a short period of time.
  2. to acquire knowledge of (a subject) by so preparing oneself.
5.
Archaic. to tell lies to.
verb (used without object), crammed, cramming.
6.
to eat greedily or to excess.
7.
to study for an examination by memorizing facts at the last minute.
8.
to press or force accommodation in a room, vehicle, etc., beyond normal or comfortable capacity; crowd; jam:
The whole team crammed into the bus.
noun
9.
Informal. the act of cramming for an examination.
10.
a crammed state.
11.
a dense crowd; throng.
Origin of cram
1000
before 1000; Middle English crammen, Old English crammian to stuff, akin to crimman to put in
Related forms
crammingly, adverb
well-crammed, adjective
Synonyms
1. crowd, pack, squeeze, compress, overcrowd. 3. glut. 6. gorge.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for crams
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Into this he crams a heavy charge of powder and waits for the dawn.

    Poachers and Poaching John Watson
  • I have no doubt the man stuffs and crams himself at her cost.

    A Charming Fellow, Volume II (of 3)

    Frances Eleanor Trollope
  • Every one knows that the mother, (saucy as the daughter sometimes is,) crams him down her throat.

    Clarissa, Volume 7 Samuel Richardson
  • The student who "crams" for an examination makes no permanent addition "Cramming" and "Willing" to his knowledge.

    The Trained Memory Warren Hilton
  • He crams into his bag indiscriminately the last vaudeville, the last sermon of the Archbishop, and the last essay of the Academy.

  • It would be difficult to find a man who crams more work into what are supposed to be his leisure hours.

    The Red Hand of Ulster George A. Birmingham
  • The Whiting gloats, devours, crams itself so with Herring that it becomes one luscious mass of fat.

    The Sea Jules Michelet
  • These are a grass which crams the clothes and feet with maddening needles; once in they seemed there 'for duration.'

    The Leicestershires beyond Baghdad

    Edward John Thompson
British Dictionary definitions for crams

cram

/kræm/
verb crams, cramming, crammed
1.
(transitive) to force (people, material, etc) into (a room, container, etc) with more than it can hold; stuff
2.
to eat or cause to eat more than necessary
3.
(informal) to study or cause to study (facts, etc), esp for an examination, by hastily memorizing
noun
4.
the act or condition of cramming
5.
a crush
Word Origin
Old English crammian; related to Old Norse kremja to press

Cram

/kræm/
noun
1.
Steve. born 1960, English middle-distance runner: European 1500 m champion (1981, 1986); world 1500 m champion (1983)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for crams

cram

v.

Old English crammian "press something into something else," from Proto-Germanic *kram-/*krem- (cf. Old High German krimman "to press, pinch," Old Norse kremja "to squeeze, pinch"), from PIE root *ger- "to gather" (cf. Sanskrit gramah "heap, troop," Old Church Slavonic gramota "heap," Latin gremium "bosom, lap"). Meaning "study intensely for an exam" originally was British student slang first recorded 1803. Related: Crammed; cramming.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for crams

cram

modifier

: a cram session/ cram book

noun

A very diligent student; grind (1900s+)

verb

To study intensively for an upcoming examination (1803+ British students)

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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