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crock2

[krok]
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noun
  1. a person or thing that is old, decrepit, or broken-down.
  2. Slang. a person who complains about or insists on being treated for an imagined illness.
  3. an old ewe.
  4. an old worn-out horse.
verb (used with object)
  1. British Slang. to disable or injure.

Origin of crock2

1300–50; Middle English crok old ewe, perhaps akin to crack (v.) and obsolete crack whore; compare Low German krakke broken-down horse

crock3

[krok]
noun
  1. British Dialect. soot; smut.
  2. excess surface dye from imperfectly dyed cloth.
verb (used with object)
  1. British Dialect. to soil with soot.
verb (used without object)
  1. (of cloth) to give off excess surface dye when rubbed.

Origin of crock3

First recorded in 1650–60; origin uncertain
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018
British Dictionary definitions for crocking

crock1

noun
  1. an earthen pot, jar, etc
  2. a piece of broken earthenware
  3. Also: crock of shit US and Canadian informal a quantity or source of lies or nonsense

Word Origin

Old English crocc pot; related to Old Norse krukka jug, Middle Low German krūke pot

crock2

noun
  1. slang, mainly British a person or thing, such as a car, that is old or decrepit (esp in the phrase old crock)
  2. an old broken-down horse or ewe
verb
  1. slang, mainly British to become or cause to become weak or disabled

Word Origin

C15: originally Scottish; related to Norwegian krake unhealthy animal, Dutch kraak decrepit person or animal

crock3

noun
  1. dialect, mainly British soot or smut
  2. colour that rubs off fabric
verb
  1. (tr) dialect, mainly British to soil with or as if with soot
  2. (intr) (of a dyed fabric) to release colour when rubbed, as a result of imperfect dyeing

Word Origin

C17: probably from crock 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for crocking

crock

n.

Old English crocc, crocca "pot, vessel," from Proto-Germanic *krogu "pitcher, pot" (cf. Old Frisian krocha "pot," Old Saxon kruka, Middle Dutch cruke, Dutch kruik, Old High German kruog "pitcher," German Krug, Old Norse krukka "pot"). Perhaps from the same source as Middle Irish crocan "pot," Greek krossos "pitcher," Old Church Slavonic krugla "cup." Used as an image of worthless rubbish since 19c., perhaps from the use of crockery as chamberpots.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper