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crozier

[kroh-zher] /ˈkroʊ ʒər/
noun
1.

crosier

or crozier

[kroh-zher] /ˈkroʊ ʒər/
noun
1.
a ceremonial staff carried by a bishop or an abbot, hooked at one end like a shepherd's crook.
2.
Botany. the circinate young frond of a fern.
Origin of crosier
1350-1400
1350-1400; short for crosier-staff; Middle English crosier staff-bearer < Middle French; replacing Middle English crocer < Anglo-French. See crosse, -er2
Related forms
crosiered, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for crozier
Historical Examples
  • The superior rose, took her crozier in her hand, and walked out of the room.

    A Son of Hagar

    Sir Hall Caine
  • The priest tore off his tiara, broke his crozier, and rent his tinsel cope.

    Notre-Dame de Paris Victor Hugo
  • crozier is in love with the former—Cadwallader with the latter.

  • “At the new wharf in the harbour,” crozier is heard to say; for it is he who commands.

  • On his side, crozier remains cool, admonishing Cadwallader to do the same.

  • crozier and Carmen are in the advance, Cadwallader and Iñez behind.

  • “This will do,” says crozier, putting the card into his pocket.

  • crozier, who has both seen and played it, promises to initiate him.

  • crozier feels it keenest, since it is an affair which most concerns him.

  • Both are armed; crozier has his sword, Cadwallader his dirk.

British Dictionary definitions for crozier

crozier

/ˈkrəʊʒə/
noun
1.
a variant spelling of crosier

crosier

/ˈkrəʊʒə/
noun
1.
a staff surmounted by a crook or cross, carried by bishops as a symbol of pastoral office
2.
the tip of a young plant, esp a fern frond, that is coiled into a hook
Word Origin
C14: from Old French crossier staff bearer, from crosse pastoral staff, literally: hooked stick, of Germanic origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for crozier
n.

late 13c., from Old French crocier, from Medieval Latin crociarius "bearer of a cross," from crocia "cross;" also from Old French croisier "one who bears or has to do with a cross" (see cross (n.)). The two words merged in Middle English. Technically, "the bearer of a bishop's pastoral staff;" erroneously applied to the staff itself since 1733.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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18
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