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damping

[dam-ping] /ˈdæm pɪŋ/
noun, Physics.
1.
a decreasing of the amplitude of an electrical or mechanical wave.
2.
an energy-absorbing mechanism or resistance circuit causing this decrease.
3.
a reduction in the amplitude of an oscillation or vibration as a result of energy being dissipated as heat.

damp

[damp] /dæmp/
adjective, damper, dampest.
1.
slightly wet; moist:
damp weather; a damp towel.
2.
unenthusiastic; dejected; depressed:
The welcoming committee gave them a rather damp reception.
noun
3.
moisture; humidity; moist air:
damp that goes through your warmest clothes.
4.
a noxious or stifling vapor or gas, especially in a mine.
5.
depression of spirits; dejection.
6.
a restraining or discouraging force or factor.
verb (used with object)
7.
to make damp; moisten.
8.
to check or retard the energy, action, etc., of; deaden; dampen:
A series of failures damped her enthusiasm.
9.
to stifle or suffocate; extinguish:
to damp a furnace.
10.
Acoustics, Music. to check or retard the action of (a vibrating string); dull; deaden.
11.
Physics. to cause a decrease in amplitude of (successive oscillations or waves).
Verb phrases
12.
damp off, to undergo damping-off.
Origin of damp
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English (in sense of def. 4); compare Middle Dutch damp, Middle High German dampf vapor, smoke
Related forms
dampish, adjective
dampishly, adverb
dampishness, noun
damply, adverb
dampness, noun
Can be confused
damp, moist (see synonym study at the current entry)
damp, dampen.
Synonyms
1. dank, steamy. 3. dankness, dampness, fog, vapor. 7. humidify. 8. slow, inhibit, restrain, moderate, abate.
Antonyms
1. dry.
Synonym Study
1.Damp, humid, moist mean slightly wet. Damp usually implies slight and extraneous wetness, generally undesirable or unpleasant unless the result of intention: a damp cellar; to put a damp cloth on a patient's forehead. Humid is applied to unpleasant dampness in the air: The air is oppressively humid today. Moist denotes something that is slightly wet, naturally or properly: moist ground; moist leather.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for damping
Historical Examples
  • Mr Vernon had recourse to a ruse to assist in damping their spirits.

    Salt Water W. H. G. Kingston
  • We neither of us answered, for it seemed like damping his enterprise.

    Devon Boys George Manville Fenn
  • These two methods of damping are confined to upright pianos.

    How it Works Archibald Williams
  • “I am slow to make discoveries,” said Horrocks grimly, damping her suddenly.

  • damping the groundwork, except where the ornament is placed, should be avoided.

    The Decoration of Leather Georges de Rcy
  • She told Mollie once that "she was as soft and damping as a November mist."

    Mollie's Prince

    Rosa Nouchette Carey
  • Great care is needful with tender seedlings to keep them from damping off.

    Talks about Flowers. M. D. Wellcome
  • Neither should the bed be kept too wet, else there is danger of "damping off."

  • On the other hand, I was ashamed of damping any one's pleasure by being there.

    Erema R. D. Blackmore
  • The damping cloth on the left of this raised string can also be seen.

    Harpsichords and Clavichords Cynthia A. Hoover
British Dictionary definitions for damping

damping

/ˈdæmpɪŋ/
noun
1.
moistening or wetting
2.
stifling, as of spirits
3.
(electronics) the introduction of resistance into a resonant circuit with the result that the sharpness of response at the peak of a frequency is reduced
4.
(engineering) any method of dispersing energy in a vibrating system

damp

/dæmp/
adjective
1.
slightly wet, as from dew, steam, etc
2.
(archaic) dejected
noun
3.
slight wetness; moisture; humidity
4.
rank air or poisonous gas, esp in a mine See also firedamp
5.
a discouragement; damper
6.
(archaic) dejection
verb (transitive)
7.
to make slightly wet
8.
(often foll by down) to stifle or deaden: to damp one's ardour
9.
(often foll by down) to reduce the flow of air to (a fire) to make it burn more slowly or to extinguish it
10.
(physics) to reduce the amplitude of (an oscillation or wave)
11.
(music) to muffle (the sound of an instrument)
See also damp off
Derived Forms
dampish, adjective
damply, adverb
dampness, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Middle Low German damp steam; related to Old High German demphen to cause to steam
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for damping

damp

v.

late 14c., "to suffocate," from damp (n.). Figurative meaning "to deaden (the spirits, etc.)" attested by 1540s. Meaning "to moisten" is recorded from 1670s. Related: Damped; damping.

damp

adj.

1580s, "dazed," from damp (n.). Meaning "slightly wet" is from 1706. Related: Dampness.

damp

n.

early 14c., "a noxious vapor," perhaps in Old English but there is no record of it. If not, probably from Middle Low German damp; ultimately in either case from Proto-Germanic *dampaz (cf. Old High German damph, German Dampf "vapor;" Old Norse dampi "dust"). Sense of "moisture, humidity" is first certainly attested 1706.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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damping in Science
damping
  (dām'pĭng)   
The action of a substance or of an element in a mechanical or electrical device that gradually reduces the degree of oscillation, vibration, or signal intensity, or prevents it from increasing. For example, sound-proofing technology dampens the oscillations of sound waves. Built-in damping is a crucial design element in technology that involves the creation of oscillations and vibrations.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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