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daresay

or dare say

[dair-sey] /ˈdɛərˈseɪ/
verb (used with or without object)
1.
to venture to say (something); assume (something) as probable (used only in present sing. 1st person):
I daresay we will soon finish.
Origin of daresay
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English dar sayen I dare to say
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for daresay
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Historical Examples
  • Perhaps that is a sign—I daresay it is—that I have not had much of what is not happiness.

    Weighed and Wanting George MacDonald
  • She's rather too old, and I'm rather too young to adopt her; but I daresay she would marry me.

    Weighed and Wanting George MacDonald
  • I daresay she's right, old chap, only I'd like to be regular myself.

    The Foolish Lovers St. John G. Ervine
  • "I daresay I did, but I can't break this one," she retorted.

    The Foolish Lovers St. John G. Ervine
  • I had other hopes for you, but they weren't your hopes, and I daresay you're right.

    The Foolish Lovers St. John G. Ervine

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