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deceive

[dih-seev] /dɪˈsiv/
verb (used with object), deceived, deceiving.
1.
to mislead by a false appearance or statement; delude:
They deceived the enemy by disguising the destroyer as a freighter.
2.
to be unfaithful to (one's spouse or lover).
3.
Archaic. to while away (time).
verb (used without object), deceived, deceiving.
4.
to mislead or falsely persuade others; practice deceit:
an engaging manner that easily deceives.
Origin of deceive
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English deceiven < Old French deceivre < Latin dēcipere, literally, to ensnare, equivalent to dē- de- + -cipere, combining form of capere to take
Related forms
deceivableness, deceivability, noun
deceivably, adverb
deceiver, noun
deceivingly, adverb
interdeceive, verb, interdeceived, interdeceiving.
nondeceiving, adjective
predeceive, verb (used with object), predeceived, predeceiving.
predeceiver, noun
redeceive, verb (used with object), redeceived, redeceiving.
well-deceived, adjective
Synonyms
1. cozen, dupe, fool, gull, hoodwink, trick, defraud, outwit, entrap, ensnare, betray.
Synonym Study
1. See cheat.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for deceivers
Historical Examples
  • But the Sophist is the Proteus who takes the likeness of all of them; all other deceivers have a piece of him in them.

    Sophist Plato
  • Feeders of cheap honey for market, deceivers or deceived, 335.

  • They were but human beings, food for imposture, and preyed on by deceivers.

    The Golden Dog William Kirby
  • Was he thus suddenly to be entangled into a snare laid for his credulity by deceivers?

    Zanoni Edward Bulwer Lytton
  • At first, they themselves are deceivers: and afterwards, they are deceived in their turn.

    Paul and Virginia Bernardin de Saint Pierre
  • It is not remarkable that she formed the conclusion that men were "deceivers ever."

    The Magnificent Montez Horace Wyndham
  • I should have seen the sickly romance which ends in dupes and deceivers.

    What Will He Do With It, Complete Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • Scorn is hurled in our faces and the reputation accorded us is that of deceivers.

    Epistle Sermons, Vol. II Martin Luther
  • Do you think the gods will come to the help of perjurers and deceivers?

  • But you're all the same; you are nothing but deceivers, as mother says.

    A Widow's Tale and Other Stories

    Mrs. (Margaret) Oliphant
British Dictionary definitions for deceivers

deceive

/dɪˈsiːv/
verb (transitive)
1.
to mislead by deliberate misrepresentation or lies
2.
to delude (oneself)
3.
to be unfaithful to (one's sexual partner)
4.
(archaic) to disappoint: his hopes were deceived
Derived Forms
deceivable, adjective
deceivably, adverb
deceivableness, deceivability, noun
deceiver, noun
deceiving, noun, adjective
deceivingly, adverb
Word Origin
C13: from Old French deceivre, from Latin dēcipere to ensnare, cheat, from capere to take
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for deceivers

deceive

v.

c.1300, from Old French decevoir (12c., Modern French décevoir) "to deceive," from Latin decipere "to ensnare, take in, beguile, cheat," from de- "from" or pejorative + capere "to take" (see capable). Related: Deceived; deceiver; deceiving.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for deceivers

deceivers

Related Terms

falsies

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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15
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