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deshabille

[dez-uh-beel, -bee] /ˌdɛz əˈbil, -ˈbi/
noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for deshabille
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • And of necessity, even the noble have their moments of deshabille.

    The Spenders Harry Leon Wilson
  • He was dressed, again by the hands of the incomparable Leduc, in a deshabille of some artistry.

    The Lion's Skin Rafael Sabatini
  • He had, of course, slept in the house, seeing he presented himself in deshabille.

    David Elginbrod George MacDonald
  • "The evidence is very strong," she said, lazily settling her deshabille.

    The Crooked House

    Brandon Fleming
  • It was the lawyer, in deshabille and very rough-haired; and very angry he looked.

  • It must have been near midnight, and Admiral Porter was in deshabille.

  • He was in deshabille and was sweeping out his office with a hard brush and shovel.

    The Soul of John Brown Stephen Graham
  • "Do you know, I like that kind of deshabille," said Cradell.

    The Small House at Allington

    Anthony Trollope
  • I knocked at one at a hazard, and was rejected by a large woman in deshabille.

    A Woman of Genius Mary Austin
British Dictionary definitions for deshabille

deshabille

/ˌdeɪzæˈbiːl/
noun
1.
the state of being partly or carelessly dressed
2.
(archaic) clothes worn in such a state
Word Origin
C17: from French déshabillé undressed, from dés-dis-1 + habiller to dress; see habiliment
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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