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discomfort

[dis-kuhm-fert] /dɪsˈkʌm fərt/
noun
1.
an absence of comfort or ease; uneasiness, hardship, or mild pain.
2.
anything that is disturbing to or interferes with comfort.
verb (used with object)
3.
to disturb the comfort or happiness of; make uncomfortable or uneasy.
Origin of discomfort
1300-1350
1300-50; (v.) Middle English discomforten to discourage, pain < Anglo-French descomforter to sadden, grieve; see dis-1, comfort; (noun) Middle English < Anglo-French, derivative of v.
Related forms
discomfortable
[dis-kuhm-fer-tuh-buh l, -kuhmf-tuh-] /dɪsˈkʌm fər tə bəl, -ˈkʌmf tə-/ (Show IPA),
adjective
discomfortingly, adverb
Can be confused
discomfit, discomfort.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for discomfort
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I sincerely hope that what I have done will not result in any discomfort or inconvenience to you.

    Her Father's Daughter Gene Stratton-Porter
  • However, in spite of discomfort, we would not have missed the journey on any account.

    In the Heart of Vosges Matilda Betham-Edwards
  • He found to his own discomfort what was the fact and the reality, which were not very convenient for him.

    Welsh Fairy Tales William Elliott Griffis
  • You can excuse the disorder and discomfort of a painter's studio?'

    Little Dorrit Charles Dickens
  • Prada again felt worried, a prey to the discomfort of uncertainty.

British Dictionary definitions for discomfort

discomfort

/dɪsˈkʌmfət/
noun
1.
an inconvenience, distress, or mild pain
2.
something that disturbs or deprives of ease
verb
3.
(transitive) to make uncomfortable or uneasy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for discomfort
n.

mid-14c., from Old French desconfort (12c.), from desconforter (v.), from des- (see dis-) + conforter (see comfort (v.)).

v.

c.1300, "to deprive of courage," from Old French desconforter; see discomfort (n.). Related: Discomforted; discomforting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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