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2017 Word of the Year

drowse

[drouz] /draʊz/
verb (used without object), drowsed, drowsing.
1.
to be sleepy or half-asleep.
2.
to be dull or sluggish.
verb (used with object), drowsed, drowsing.
3.
to pass or spend (time) in drowsing (often followed by away):
He drowsed away the morning.
4.
to make sleepy.
noun
5.
a sleepy condition; state of being half-asleep.
Origin of drowse
900
before 900; Old English drūsian to droop, become sluggish (not recorded in ME); akin to Old English drēosan to fall
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for drowse
Historical Examples
  • And then jest as I was gettin' into a drowse, I heard the cat in the buttery, and I got up to let her out.

  • Your days of hope are over, and you want to drowse by the fire.

    Northern Lights Gilbert Parker
  • The landscape seemed to be in drowse, half-sleeping and half-waking.

    A Spoil of Office Hamlin Garland
  • She was no sensualist, longing to drowse sleepily in the lap of luxury.

    Sister Carrie Theodore Dreiser
  • Unceremoniously Stair Garland awaked Louis from his drowse in the cave's mouth.

    Patsy S. R. Crockett
  • Dot's head was pillowed on his knee, and presently she began to drowse.

    The Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe

    Amanda Minnie Douglas
  • Facing the chill blackness without the window, she tried to drowse off.

    Mountain Clement Wood
  • She had not slept, either; it was from her first drowse that Adeline had wakened her.

    The Quality of Mercy W. D. Howells
  • He dare not drowse, for he cannot tell at what moment the quarry may appear.

    Life in an Indian Outpost Gordon Casserly
  • Do they come when you are just drowsing, or just waking from a drowse?

    Between The Dark And The Daylight William Dean Howells
British Dictionary definitions for drowse

drowse

/draʊz/
verb
1.
to be or cause to be sleepy, dull, or sluggish
noun
2.
the state of being drowsy
Word Origin
C16: probably from Old English drūsian to sink; related to drēosan to fall
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for drowse
v.

1570s, probably a back-formation from drowsy. Old English had a similar word, but there is a 600-year gap. Related: Drowsed; drowsing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for drowse

10
10
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