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ed

[ed] /ɛd/
noun, Informal.
1.
education:
a course in driver's ed; adult ed.
Origin of ed
by shortening

Ed

[ed] /ɛd/
noun
1.
a male given name, form of Edgar or Edward.

ED

2.
Pathology. erectile dysfunction.

ed.

1.
edited.
2.
plural eds. edition.
3.
plural eds. editor.
4.

ED50

Pharmacology.
1.
effective dose for 50 percent of the group; the amount of a drug that is therapeutic in 50 percent of the persons or animals in which it is tested.

-ed1

1.
a suffix forming the past tense of weak verbs:
he crossed the river.
Origin
Old English -de, -ede, -ode, -ade; orig. disputed

-ed2

1.
a suffix forming the past participle of weak verbs (he had crossed the river), and of participial adjectives indicating a condition or quality resulting from the action of the verb (inflated balloons).
Origin
Old English -ed, -od, -ad; orig. disputed

-ed3

1.
a suffix forming adjectives from nouns:
bearded; monied; tender-hearted.
Origin
Middle English; Old English -ede

E.D.

1.
Eastern Department.
2.
election district.
3.
ex dividend.
4.
executive director.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for ed
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • ed Meyers laughed, uncomfortably, and glanced yearningly toward the door.

    Roast Beef, Medium Edna Ferber
  • ed, I'd like mightily to take some word from you to your brother Abner.

    The Escape of Mr. Trimm Irvin S. Cobb
  • An owl-haunted tree it certainly looked, but at that hour of the day there was little surprise that ed saw nothing of him.

    The Believing Years Edmund Lester Pearson
  • ed began to realize it was getting late in the morning, and he had not yet had breakfast.

    Cat and Mouse Ralph Williams
  • However, he had curiosity enough to ask, "What upset things 'tween you 'n ed?"

    Prairie Folks Hamlin Garland
British Dictionary definitions for ed

ed.

abbreviation
1.
edited
2.
(pl) eds. edition
3.
(pl) eds. editor

-ed1

suffix
1.
forming the past tense of most English verbs
Word Origin
Old English -de, -ede, -ode, -ade

-ed2

suffix
1.
forming the past participle of most English verbs
Word Origin
Old English -ed, -od, -ad

-ed3

suffix
1.
possessing or having the characteristics of: salaried; red-blooded
Word Origin
Old English -ede
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for ed

-ed

past participle suffix of weak verbs, from Old English -ed, -ad. --od (leveled to -ed in Middle English), from Proto-Germanic *-do- (cf. Old High German -ta, German -t, Old Norse -þa, Gothic -da, -þs), from PIE *-to- (cf. Sanskrit -tah, Greek -tos, Latin -tus).

Originally fully pronounced, as still in beloved (which, with blessed, accursed, and a few others retains the full pronunciation through liturgical readings). In 16c.-18c. often written -t when so pronounced (usually after a consonant or short vowel), and still so where a long vowel in the stem is short in the pp. (e.g. crept, slept, etc.). In some older words both forms exist, with different shades of meaning, e.g. gilded/gilt, burned/burnt.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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ed in Medicine

ED abbr.
effective dose

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Slang definitions & phrases for ed

Ed

Related Terms

op-ed page

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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