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Eda

[ed-uh] /ˈɛd ə/
noun
1.
a female given name.

EDA

1.
Economic Development Administration.

Edda1

or Eda

[ed-uh] /ˈɛd ə/
noun
1.
a female given name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for Eda
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • “You will be steersman and sit in the stern, Eda,” said Frank, as they embarked.

    Ungava R.M. Ballantyne
  • “Let me lean on your shoulder, dear Eda,” he said in a faint voice.

    Ungava R.M. Ballantyne
  • Eda is very anxious that we should be told all about your wonderful adventures in the mountains.

    Ungava R.M. Ballantyne
  • You recollect the hut we built on the lake when I was so badly hurt, and when you were lost, Eda?

    Ungava R.M. Ballantyne
  • Janet sometimes walked there, alone or with her friend Eda Rawle.

  • Eda bit one dubiously with her long, white teeth, and giggled.

  • She gained the avenue she had trod with Eda on that summer day of the circus.

  • She had been almost self-convinced of an intention to go to Eda's—not quite.

  • Of late her conscience had reproached her about Eda, Janet had neglected her.

British Dictionary definitions for Eda

Edda

/ˈɛdə/
noun
1.
Also called Elder Edda, Poetic Edda. a collection of mythological Old Norse poems made in the 12th century
2.
Also called Younger Edda, Prose Edda. a treatise on versification together with a collection of Scandinavian myths, legends, and poems compiled by Snorri Sturluson (1179–1241), the Icelandic historian and poet
Derived Forms
Eddaic (ɛˈdeɪɪk) adjective
Word Origin
C18: Old Norse
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for Eda

Edda

n.

1771, by some identified with the name of the old woman in the Old Norse poem "Rigsþul," by others derived from Old Norse oðr "spirit, mind, passion, song, poetry" (cognate with Old Irish faith "poet," Welsh gwawd "poem," Old English woþ "sound, melody, song," Latin vates "seer, soothsayer;" see wood (adj.)).

It is the name given to two Icelandic books, the first a miscellany of poetry, mythology, and grammar by Snorri Sturluson (d.1241), since 1642 called the Younger or Prose Edda; and a c.1200 collection of ancient Germanic poetry and religious tales, called the Elder or Poetic Edda.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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