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2017 Word of the Year

educate

[ej-oo-keyt] /ˈɛdʒ ʊˌkeɪt/
verb (used with object), educated, educating.
1.
to develop the faculties and powers of (a person) by teaching, instruction, or schooling.
2.
to qualify by instruction or training for a particular calling, practice, etc.; train:
to educate someone for law.
3.
to provide schooling or training for; send to school.
4.
to develop or train (the ear, taste, etc.):
to educate one's palate to appreciate fine food.
5.
to inform:
to educate oneself about the best course of action.
verb (used without object), educated, educating.
6.
to educate a person or group:
A television program that educates can also entertain.
Origin of educate
1580-1590
1580-90; < Latin ēducātus brought up, taught (past participle of ēducāre), equivalent to ē- e-1 + -duc- lead + -ātus -ate1
Related forms
overeducate, verb (used with object), overeducated, overeducating.
preeducate, verb (used with object), preeducated, preeducating.
Synonym Study
1. See teach.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for educate
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Basil Kendall was well educated, and had done what he could to educate his children.

  • Why, then, did the Great Teacher not educate His followers fully?

    Pax Vobiscum Henry Drummond
  • He believed that he was chosen by God to educate, guide and discipline the German people.

    Blood and Iron John Hubert Greusel
  • But then again, when I contemplate any of those who pretend to educate others, I am amazed.

    Euthydemus Plato
  • But do you wish to live for the sake of your children, that you may rear and educate them?

British Dictionary definitions for educate

educate

/ˈɛdjʊˌkeɪt/
verb (mainly transitive)
1.
(also intransitive) to impart knowledge by formal instruction to (a pupil); teach
2.
to provide schooling for (children): I have educated my children at the best schools
3.
to improve or develop (a person, judgment, taste, skills, etc)
4.
to train for some particular purpose or occupation
Word Origin
C15: from Latin ēducāre to rear, educate, from dūcere to lead
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for educate
v.

mid-15c., "bring up (children), train," from Latin educatus, past participle of educare "bring up, rear, educate," which is related to educere "bring out, lead forth," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + ducere "to lead" (see duke (n.)). Meaning "provide schooling" is first attested 1580s. Related: Educated; educating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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