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[ih-lood] /ɪˈlud/
verb (used with object), eluded, eluding.
to avoid or escape by speed, cleverness, trickery, etc.; evade:
to elude capture.
Synonyms: shun, dodge.
to escape the understanding, perception, or appreciation of:
The answer eludes me.
Origin of elude
1530-40; < Latin ēlūdere to deceive, evade, equivalent to ē- e-1 + lūdere to play, deceive
Related forms
eluder, noun
uneluded, adjective
Can be confused
allowed, allude, aloud, elude.
Synonym Study
1. See escape. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for eluded
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • But that night I dreamed out the success which had eluded my waking hours.

  • I have often since tried to recall it, but as yet it has eluded all my efforts.

    Wilfrid Cumbermede George MacDonald
  • But now the object of his pursuit vanished from his sight, and eluded his eager search.

    Imogen William Godwin
  • In all the devices we have considered thus far the enemy is eluded.

    The Meaning of Evolution Samuel Christian Schmucker
  • She eluded the question and said, "You sent for me—what do you wish to say?"

    The Eternal City Hall Caine
British Dictionary definitions for eluded


verb (transitive)
to escape or avoid (capture, one's pursuers, etc), esp by cunning
to avoid fulfilment of (a responsibility, obligation, etc); evade
to escape discovery, or understanding by; baffle: the solution eluded her
Derived Forms
eluder, noun
elusion (ɪˈluːʒən) noun
Usage note
Elude is sometimes wrongly used where allude is meant: he was alluding (not eluding) to his previous visit to the city
Word Origin
C16: from Latin ēlūdere to deceive, from lūdere to play
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for eluded



1530s, "delude, make a fool of," from Latin eludere "escape from, make a fool of, win from at play," from ex- "out, away" (see ex-) + ludere "to play" (see ludicrous). Sense of "evade" is first recorded 1610s in a figurative sense, 1630s in a literal one. Related: Eluded; eludes; eluding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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