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emaciated

[ih-mey-shee-ey-tid] /ɪˈmeɪ ʃiˌeɪ tɪd/
adjective
1.
marked by emaciation.
Origin of emaciated
1655-1665
First recorded in 1655-65; emaciate + -ed2
Related forms
unemaciated, adjective
Synonyms
thin, wasted, puny, gaunt, haggard, scrawny.

emaciate

[ih-mey-shee-eyt] /ɪˈmeɪ ʃiˌeɪt/
verb (used with object), emaciated, emaciating.
1.
to make abnormally lean or thin by a gradual wasting away of flesh.
Origin
1640-50; < Latin ēmaciātus, wasted away, equivalent to ē- e-1 + maciātus, past participle of maciāre to produce leanness (maci(ēs) leanness + -ātus -ate1)
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for emaciated
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • His handsome face, emaciated and pale, was that of the immortal Bonaparte.

    My Double Life Sarah Bernhardt
  • Starvation is in the emaciated features, the brilliant feverish eyes.

    The Night Riders Ridgwell Cullum
  • But what held his attention most was the lean, emaciated face and penetrating eyes.

    The Golden Woman Ridgwell Cullum
  • The man, though young and athletic, was emaciated and weary-looking.

    The O'Donoghue Charles James Lever
  • You haven't a particle of feeling, or you would be emaciated by this time.

    Molly Bawn Margaret Wolfe Hamilton
British Dictionary definitions for emaciated

emaciated

/ɪˈmeɪsɪˌeɪtɪd/
adjective
1.
abnormally thin

emaciate

/ɪˈmeɪsɪˌeɪt/
verb
1.
(usually transitive) to become or cause to become abnormally thin
Derived Forms
emaciation, noun
Word Origin
C17: from Latin ēmaciāre to make lean, from macer thin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for emaciated
adj.

1660s, past participle adjective from emaciate.

emaciate

v.

1620s (implied in emaciating), from Latin emaciatus, past participle of emaciare "make lean, waste away," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + macies "leanness," from macer "thin" (see macro-). Related: Emaciated; emaciating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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