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erne

or ern

[urn]
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noun
  1. sea eagle.

Origin of erne

before 1000; Middle English ern, arn, Old English earn; cognate with Old High German arn (German Aar), Middle Low German arn(e); akin to Lithuanian erẽlis eagle, Greek órnīs bird

-ern

  1. an adjective suffix occurring with names of directions: northern; southern.

Origin of -ern

Middle English, Old English -erne; cognate with Old High German -rōni (as in nordrōni northern)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for ern

Historical Examples

  • "I'll not be good company, Ern," but Roger's voice was wistful.

    The Forbidden Trail

    Honor Willsie

  • Ern, don't you remember the pretty little girl who used to play with us?

    The Forbidden Trail

    Honor Willsie

  • Say, Ern, before I read the mail, I've got some news for you.

    The Forbidden Trail

    Honor Willsie

  • "Look here, Ern, you've got to straighten this business out," insisted Roger.

    The Forbidden Trail

    Honor Willsie

  • Ern, you hold his hands above his head while I cut off that pants leg.

    The Forbidden Trail

    Honor Willsie


British Dictionary definitions for ern

erne

ern

noun
  1. another name for the (European) sea eagle

Word Origin

Old English earn; related to Old Norse örn eagle, Old High German aro eagle, Greek ornis bird

Erne

noun
  1. a river in N central Republic of Ireland, rising in County Cavan and flowing north across the border, through Upper Lough Erne and Lower Lough Erne and then west to Donegal Bay. Length: about 96 km (60 miles)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for ern

erne

n.

"sea eagle," from Old English earn "eagle," a common Germanic word (cf. Old High German arn, German Aar, Middle Dutch arent, Old Norse örn, Gothic ara "eagle"), from PIE root *or- "great bird, eagle" (cf. Greek ornis "bird," Old Church Slavonic orilu, Lithuanian erelis, Welsh eryr "eagle"). The Germanic word also survives in the first element of old Germanic names such as Arnold and Arthur.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper