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exert

[ig-zurt] /ɪgˈzɜrt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to put forth or into use, as power; exercise, as ability or influence; put into vigorous action:
to exert every effort.
2.
to put (oneself) into strenuous, vigorous action or effort.
Origin of exert
1650-1660
1650-60; < Latin ex(s)ertus, past participle of exserere to thrust out, equivalent to ex- ex-1 + ser(ere) to bind together + -tus past participle suffix
Related forms
exertive, adjective
nonexertive, adjective
superexert, verb (used with object)
unexerted, adjective
well-exerted, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for exert
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Moreover, she will never again have opportunity to exert influence over me.

    Philothea Lydia Maria Child
  • She must take care to exert it kindly but seriously now that the old Judge was gone.

    Meadow Grass Alice Brown
  • She knew not how to exert any such will, she could not, she would not exert it.

  • What was the influence, the fascination that strange old Frenchman seemed to exert?

    The Inn at the Red Oak Latta Griswold
  • The army and navy also exert a detrimental action on sexual life.

    The Sexual Question August Forel
British Dictionary definitions for exert

exert

/ɪɡˈzɜːt/
verb (transitive)
1.
to use (influence, authority, etc) forcefully or effectively
2.
to apply (oneself) diligently; make a strenuous effort
Derived Forms
exertion, noun
exertive, adjective
Word Origin
C17 (in the sense: push forth, emit): from Latin exserere to thrust out, from ex-1 + serere to bind together, entwine
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for exert
v.

1660s, "thrust forth, push out," from Latin exertus/exsertus, past participle of exerere/exserere "thrust out, put forth," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + serere "attach, join" (see series). Meaning "put into use" is 1680s. Related: Exerted; exerting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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12
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