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exploit2

[verb ik-sploit; noun eks-ploit, ik-sploit] /verb ɪkˈsplɔɪt; noun ˈɛks plɔɪt, ɪkˈsplɔɪt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to utilize, especially for profit; turn to practical account:
to exploit a business opportunity.
2.
to use selfishly for one's own ends:
employers who exploit their workers.
3.
to advance or further through exploitation; promote:
He exploited his new movie through a series of guest appearances.
noun, Digital Technology.
4.
  1. a flaw in hardware or software that is vulnerable to hacking or other cyberattacks.
  2. a piece of software that takes advantage of such a flaw to compromise a computer system or network.
5.
(in a video game) the use of a bug or flaw in game design to a player’s advantage or to the disadvantage of other players.
Origin of exploit2
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; < French exploiter, derivative of exploit (noun); replacing late Middle English expleiten “to achieve,” from Anglo-French, Middle French espleiter, espleitier derivative of espleit, esploit (noun). See exploit1
Related forms
exploitable, adjective
exploitability, noun
exploitative, exploitatory
[ik-sploi-tuh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] /ɪkˈsplɔɪ təˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i/ (Show IPA),
exploitive, adjective
exploiter, noun
half-exploited, adjective
nonexploitable, adjective
nonexploitative, adjective
nonexploitive, adjective
self-exploited, adjective
self-exploiting, adjective
unexploitable, adjective
unexploitative, adjective
unexploited, adjective
unexploitive, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for exploiters
Historical Examples
  • Society is divided by antagonistic interests; into exploiters and exploited.

  • How could the exploiters gain the confidence of the American people?

    The American Empire

    Scott Nearing
  • Stirner knew perfectly what to expect from the "devotion" of the exploiters.

    Anarchism and Socialism

    George Plechanoff
  • This class embraces all mankind's tormentors, oppressors, and exploiters.

    Anarchism Paul Eltzbacher
  • The court historians of the exploiters are offended at this.

  • But he also belonged to the class of exploiters by his mental constitution.

    Balzac Frederick Lawton
  • It had made a pretty little pile of money for its exploiters.

    The Fifth Wheel Olive Higgins Prouty
  • What does it concern me, and how can I help it, if you have fallen into the hands of exploiters?

    Atlantis Gerhart Hauptmann
  • In the unceasing struggle of the workers with their exploiters the truly loyal leaders are always marked for persecution.

    Labor and Freedom Eugene V. Debs
  • Socialists are always on the side of the union when it is engaged in an honest fight against the exploiters of labor.

British Dictionary definitions for exploiters

exploit

noun (ˈɛksplɔɪt)
1.
a notable deed or feat, esp one that is noble or heroic
verb (transitive) (ɪkˈsplɔɪt)
2.
to take advantage of (a person, situation, etc), esp unethically or unjustly for one's own ends
3.
to make the best use of: to exploit natural resources
Derived Forms
exploitable, adjective
exploitation, noun
exploitive, exploitative, adjective
Word Origin
C14: from Old French: accomplishment, from Latin explicitum (something) unfolded, from explicāre to explicate
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for exploiters

exploit

n.

late 14c., "outcome of an action," from Old French esploit (12c.), a very common word, used in senses of "action, deed, profit, achievement," from Latin explicitum "a thing settled, ended, displayed," neuter of explicitus, past participle of explicare "unfold" (see explicit).

Meaning "feat, achievement" is c.1400. Sense evolution is from "unfolding" to "bringing out" to "having advantage" to "achievement." Related: Exploits.

exploit

v.

c.1400 espleiten, esploiten "to accomplish, achieve, fulfill," from Old French esploitier, espleiter, from esploit (see exploit (n.)).

The sense of "use selfishly" first recorded 1838, from French, perhaps extended from use of the word with reference to mines, etc. (cf. exploitation). Related: Exploited; exploiting. As an adjective form, exploitative (1882) is from French; exploitive (by 1859) appears to be a native formation.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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