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feller1

[fel-er] /ˈfɛl ər/
noun, Informal.
1.
Origin of feller1
1815-1825
1815-25; orig. dial.; by reduction of (ō) to (ə) and merger with words ending in -er

feller2

[fel-er] /ˈfɛl ər/
noun
1.
a person or thing that fells.
2.
Sewing. a person or thing that finishes a seam by felling.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English fellere. See fell2, -er1

Feller

[fel-er] /ˈfɛl ər/
noun
1.
Robert William Andrew ("Bob"; "Bullet Bob") 1918–2010, U.S. baseball player.

fell3

[fel] /fɛl/
adjective
1.
fierce; cruel; dreadful; savage.
2.
destructive; deadly:
fell poison; fell disease.
Idioms
3.
at / in one fell swoop. swoop (def 5).
Origin
1250-1300; Middle English fel < Old French, nominative of felon wicked. See felon1
Related forms
fellness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for feller
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I'm willin'; but I'm not goin' around by the back door to miss that feller.

  • Buck Bradford, the feller that robbed the mail and run away.

    Down The River Oliver Optic
  • The Head Man had put that bundle on the man hisself when he was a little bit of a feller.

    Story-Tell Lib Annie Trumbull Slosson
  • "I believe I know a feller we can unload onto," persisted Candage.

    Blow The Man Down Holman Day
  • They say, Janet is mixed up 'long with a feller what painted her, over on the Hills!

    Janet of the Dunes Harriet T. Comstock
  • "That's the feller," Rashkind said with a sigh as he pocketed the letter to Elkan.

    Elkan Lubliner, American Montague Glass
  • Man in charge, feller named Ball, he went out to look at a water-pipe.

    Careers of Danger and Daring Cleveland Moffett
  • Do you mean Max Kapfer, the feller which took over Flixman's store?

    Elkan Lubliner, American Montague Glass
British Dictionary definitions for feller

feller1

/ˈfɛlə/
noun
1.
a person or thing that fells
2.
an attachment on a sewing machine for felling seams

feller2

/ˈfɛlə/
noun
1.
a nonstandard variant of fellow

fell1

/fɛl/
verb (transitive)
1.
to cut or knock down: to fell a tree, to fell an opponent
2.
(needlework) to fold under and sew flat (the edges of a seam)
noun
3.
(US & Canadian) the timber felled in one season
4.
a seam finished by felling
Derived Forms
fellable, adjective
Word Origin
Old English fellan; related to Old Norse fella, Old High German fellen; see fall

fell2

/fɛl/
adjective
1.
(archaic) cruel or fierce; terrible
2.
(archaic) destructive or deadly: a fell disease
3.
one fell swoop, a single hasty action or occurrence
Derived Forms
fellness, noun
Word Origin
C13 fel, from Old French: cruel, from Medieval Latin fellō villain; see felon1

fell3

/fɛl/
verb
1.
the past tense of fall

fell4

/fɛl/
noun
1.
an animal skin or hide
Word Origin
Old English; related to Old High German fel skin, Old Norse berfjall bearskin, Latin pellis skin; see peel1

fell5

/fɛl/
noun
1.
(often pl) (Northern English & Scot)
  1. a mountain, hill, or tract of upland moor
  2. (in combination): fell-walking
Word Origin
C13: from Old Norse fjall; related to Old High German felis rock
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for feller

fell

v.

Old English fællan (Mercian), fyllan (West Saxon) "make fall, cause to fall," also "strike down, demolish, kill," from Proto-Germanic *fallijanan (cf. Old Frisian falla, Old Saxon fellian, Dutch fellen, Old High German fellen, German fällen, Old Norse fella, Danish fælde), causative of *fallan (Old English feallan, see fall (v.)), showing i-mutation. Related: Felled; feller; felling.

Old English feoll; past tense of fall (v.).

adj.

"cruel," late 13c., from Old French fel "cruel, fierce, vicious," from Medieval Latin fello "villain" (see felon). Phrase at one fell swoop is from "Macbeth."

n.

"rocky hill," c.1300, from Old Norse fiall "mountain," from Proto-Germanic *felzam- "rock" (cf. German Fels "stone, rock"), from PIE root *pel(i)s- "rock, cliff."

"skin or hide of an animal," Old English fel, from Proto-Germanic *fellom- (cf. Old Frisian fel, Old Saxon fel, Dutch vel, Old High German fel, German fell, Old Norse fiall, Gothic fill), from PIE *pello- (see film (n.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Idioms and Phrases with feller

fell

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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9
11
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