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fireroom

[fahyuh r-room, -roo m] /ˈfaɪərˌrum, -ˌrʊm/
noun, Nautical.
1.
a chamber in which the boilers of a steam vessel are fired.
Also called stokehold, stokehole.
Origin of fireroom
1830-1840
1830-40; Americanism
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for fireroom
Historical Examples
  • The fireroom is full of water; but it looks to me as though a seacock had been opened.

    Ruth Fielding Homeward Bound Alice B. Emerson
  • No, only put me in the fireroom, shoveling coal in the furnace.

    Dick in the Everglades A. W. Dimock
  • It was a busy time in the fireroom, but there was nothing to do on deck but watch the steamer.

  • Perhaps that explosion in the fireroom had not been meant to injure the ship seriously.

    Ruth Fielding Homeward Bound Alice B. Emerson
  • It was mounted amidships between the fireroom hatch and the break of the to'gallant fo'c's'le.

    With the Battle Fleet Franklin Matthews
  • He stood at one side as the stokers filed in from forward, ready to relieve those working in the fireroom below.

    Ruth Fielding Homeward Bound Alice B. Emerson
  • The steady thump and rattle of the pumps by which the fireroom was being cleared of water continued to sound in her ears.

    Ruth Fielding Homeward Bound Alice B. Emerson
  • He gave me an easy one, for a boy, but I struck and asked for a man's work, and got it—in the fireroom.

    Dick in the Everglades A. W. Dimock

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Word Value for fireroom

13
14
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