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fluster

[fluhs-ter] /ˈflʌs tər/
verb (used with object)
1.
to put into a state of agitated confusion:
His constant criticism flustered me.
2.
to excite and confuse with drink.
verb (used without object)
3.
to become agitatedly confused.
noun
4.
nervous excitement or confusion.
Origin of fluster
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English flostren; cf. bluster, Old Norse flaustra to hurry
Related forms
unflustered, adjective
Synonyms
1. upset, bewilder, disconcert, disturb. 4. turmoil, agitation, upset, bewilderment, distraction.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for flustered
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • And the only time he saw her flustered was when she ordered a young man of the Brons out of the building.

    Hunters Out of Space Joseph Everidge Kelleam
  • Time had never been when Martha Ann Jackson was so flustered.

    The heart of happy hollow Paul Laurence Dunbar
  • Now he's flustered me so I simply can't think where this blue silk is.

    Three Plays by Granville-Barker Harley Granville-Barker
  • "I hope you're not flustered, Miss, by the—by the—" he began.

  • He was too flustered to do more than return the pressure of the small, firm hand.

    The Downfall Emile Zola
British Dictionary definitions for flustered

fluster

/ˈflʌstə/
verb
1.
to make or become confused, nervous, or upset
noun
2.
a state of confusion or agitation
Word Origin
C15: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Icelandic flaustr to hurry, flaustra to bustle
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for flustered

fluster

v.

early 15c. (implied in flostyrynge), from a Scandinavian source (cf. Icelandic flaustr "bustle," flaustra "to bustle"). Originally "to excite," especially with drink; sense of "to flurry, confuse" is from 1724. Related: Flustered; flustering. As a noun, 1710, from the verb.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for flustered

13
15
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