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foreboding

[fawr-boh-ding, fohr-] /fɔrˈboʊ dɪŋ, foʊr-/
noun
1.
a prediction; portent.
2.
a strong inner feeling or notion of a future misfortune, evil, etc.; presentiment.
adjective
3.
that forebodes, especially evil.
Origin of foreboding
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English forbodyng (noun); see forebode, -ing1, -ing2
Related forms
forebodingly, adverb
forebodingness, noun
unforeboding, adjective
Can be confused
forbidding, foreboding.

forebode

[fawr-bohd, fohr-] /fɔrˈboʊd, foʊr-/
verb (used with object), foreboded, foreboding.
1.
to foretell or predict; be an omen of; indicate beforehand; portend:
clouds that forebode a storm.
2.
to have a strong inner feeling or notion of (a future misfortune, evil, catastrophe, etc.); have a presentiment of.
verb (used without object), foreboded, foreboding.
3.
to prophesy.
4.
to have a presentiment.
Origin
First recorded in 1595-1605; fore- + bode1
Related forms
foreboder, noun
unforeboded, adjective
Can be confused
forbade, forbid, forbidden, forebode.
Synonyms
1. foreshadow, presage, forecast, augur.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for foreboding
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • But there is one subject, on which my mind is filled with foreboding.

    Philothea Lydia Maria Child
  • As the fair Rosa, with foreboding doubt, had foretold, so it happened.

    The Black Tulip Alexandre Dumas (Pere)
  • She was weary—weary from exertion and disappointment and foreboding.

    Pee-wee Harris Percy Keese Fitzhugh
  • The foreboding was not as definite, but it was always with him; he could not shake it off.

    Shavings Joseph C. Lincoln
  • Perhaps already some foreboding of the nature of its contents was in his mind.

    The Strolling Saint Raphael Sabatini
British Dictionary definitions for foreboding

foreboding

/fɔːˈbəʊdɪŋ/
noun
1.
a feeling of impending evil, disaster, etc
2.
an omen or portent
adjective
3.
presaging something
Derived Forms
forebodingly, adverb
forebodingness, noun

forebode

/fɔːˈbəʊd/
verb
1.
to warn of or indicate (an event, result, etc) in advance
2.
to have an intuition or premonition of (an event)
Derived Forms
foreboder, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for foreboding
n.

late 14c., "a predilection, portent, omen," from fore- + verbal noun from bode. Meaning "sense of something bad about to happen" is from c.1600. Old English forebodung meant "prophecy."

forebode

v.

"feel a secret premonition," c.1600, from fore- + bode. Related: Foreboded; foreboding. Old English forebodian meant "to announce, declare."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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