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forecast

[fawr-kast, -kahst, fohr-] /ˈfɔrˌkæst, -ˌkɑst, ˈfoʊr-/
verb (used with object), forecast or forecasted, forecasting.
1.
to predict (a future condition or occurrence); calculate in advance:
to forecast a heavy snowfall; to forecast lower interest rates.
2.
to serve as a prediction of; foreshadow.
3.
to contrive or plan beforehand; prearrange.
verb (used without object), forecast or forecasted, forecasting.
4.
to conjecture beforehand; make a prediction.
5.
to plan or arrange beforehand.
noun
6.
a prediction, especially as to the weather.
7.
a conjecture as to something in the future.
8.
the act, practice, or faculty of forecasting.
9.
Archaic. foresight in planning.
Origin of forecast
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English (noun) plan. See fore-, cast1
Related forms
forecastable, adjective
forecaster, noun
reforecast, verb (used with object), reforecast or reforecasted, reforecasting.
unforecast, adjective
unforecasted, adjective
Synonyms
1. foretell, anticipate. See predict. 3. project. 4, 7. guess, estimate. 9. forethought, prescience.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for forecasted
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I have already indicated his views, most emphatically expressed and forecasted.

    Twelve Men Theodore Dreiser
  • If I had forecasted this asking I would have asked it myself.

    Seven Short Plays Lady Gregory
  • It was being run just as Billy had forecasted; there was nothing in this to shake his faith.

    Bulldog Carney W. A. Fraser
  • In the case of an ordinary criminal, Heldon Foyle might have forecasted what would happen with a fair degree of certainty.

    The Grell Mystery Frank Froest
  • The Thursday which Jenny had forecasted as likely to be busy turned out to be busy in fact.

    The Great Miss Driver Anthony Hope
  • The problem which Winnie's imagination had forecasted did not arise—or at least it exhibited no development.

    Mrs. Maxon Protests Anthony Hope
  • A heavy bombardment all along the line from La Bassee to Ypres forecasted something unusual.

  • Its exquisite irony mixed with its bluntness told all that was necessary to tell—and forecasted the inevitable fall.

    The Fight For The Republic in China Bertram Lenox Putnam Weale
  • Just as he had forecasted, just so had matters shaped themselves.

    The Wolf Cub Patrick Casey
British Dictionary definitions for forecasted

forecast

/ˈfɔːˌkɑːst/
verb -casts, -casting, -cast, -casted
1.
to predict or calculate (weather, events, etc), in advance
2.
(transitive) to serve as an early indication of
3.
(transitive) to plan in advance
noun
4.
a statement of probable future weather conditions calculated from meteorological data
5.
a prophecy or prediction
6.
the practice or power of forecasting
Derived Forms
forecaster, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for forecasted

forecast

v.

late 14c., "to scheme," from fore- "before" + casten "contrive." Meaning "predict events" first attested late 15c. Related: Forecasted; forecasting.

n.

early 15c., probably from forecast (v.); earliest sense was "forethought, prudence;" meaning "conjectured estimate of a future course" is from 1670s. A Middle English word for weather forecasting was aeromancy.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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