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fragile

[fraj-uh l; British fraj-ahyl]
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adjective
  1. easily broken, shattered, or damaged; delicate; brittle; frail: a fragile ceramic container; a very fragile alliance.
  2. vulnerably delicate, as in appearance: She has a fragile beauty.
  3. lacking in substance or force; flimsy: a fragile excuse.
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Origin of fragile

1505–15; < Latin fragilis, equivalent to frag- (variant stem of frangere to break) + -ilis -ile
Related formsfrag·ile·ly, adverbfra·gil·i·ty [fruh-jil-i-tee] /frəˈdʒɪl ɪ ti/, frag·ile·ness, nounnon·frag·ile, adjectivenon·frag·ile·ly, adverbnon·frag·ile·ness, nounnon·fra·gil·i·ty, nouno·ver·frag·ile, adjectiveun·frag·ile, adjective
Can be confusedbrittle fragile frail1 (see synonym study at frail1)

Synonyms

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1. See frail1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

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British Dictionary definitions for fragilities

fragile

adjective
  1. able to be broken easily
  2. in a weakened physical state
  3. delicate; lighta fragile touch
  4. slight; tenuousa fragile link with the past
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Derived Formsfragilely, adverbfragility (frəˈdʒɪlɪtɪ) or fragileness, noun

Word Origin

C17: from Latin fragilis, from frangere to break
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for fragilities

fragile

adj.

1510s, "liable to sin, morally weak;" c.1600, "liable to break;" a back-formation from fragility, or else from Middle French fragile (14c.), from Latin fragilis (see fragility). Transferred sense of "frail" (of persons) is from 1858.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper