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frisk

[frisk] /frɪsk/
verb (used without object)
1.
to dance, leap, skip, or gambol; frolic:
The dogs and children frisked about on the lawn.
verb (used with object)
2.
to search (a person) for concealed weapons, contraband goods, etc., by feeling the person's clothing:
The police frisked both of the suspects.
noun
3.
a leap, skip, or caper.
4.
a frolic or gambol.
5.
the act of frisking a person.
Origin of frisk
1425-1475
1425-75; late Middle English, as adj. < Middle French frisque, perhaps a spelling variant (with mute s) of fri(c)que lively, smart < Germanic (compare Middle Dutch vrec, Old High German freh avaricious, Middle High German vrech brave, German frech insolent); or < Middle French (Flanders) frisque < Middle Dutch frisc fresh
Related forms
frisker, noun
friskingly, adverb
unfrisking, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for frisk
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • frisk was so terrified at the sight of it that he did not know where to hide.

  • It's long past frisk's dinner-time, and he has not brought her food!

    Fruits of Culture Leo Tolstoy
  • Yes, frisk' (to her terrier, that was barking and jumping outside the window), 'you and I must go away.

    Gladys, the Reaper Anne Beale
  • When I frisk a pair of cut-throats with them, it's different.

    Laramie Holds the Range Frank H. Spearman
  • During the day he would descend for his food, which he carried up to his house to eat, then down again to frisk and play about.

British Dictionary definitions for frisk

frisk

/frɪsk/
verb
1.
(intransitive) to leap, move about, or act in a playful manner; frolic
2.
(transitive) (esp of animals) to whisk or wave briskly: the dog frisked its tail
3.
(transitive)
  1. to search (someone) by feeling for concealed weapons, etc
  2. to rob by searching in this way
noun
4.
a playful antic or movement; frolic
5.
the act or an instance of frisking a person
Derived Forms
frisker, noun
friskingly, adverb
Word Origin
C16: from Old French frisque, of Germanic origin; related to Old High German frisc lively, fresh
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for frisk
v.

1510s, "to dance, frolic," from Middle English frisk "lively" (mid-15c.), from Middle French frisque "lively, brisk," from Old French frisque "fresh, new; merry, animated" (13c.), possibly from a Germanic source (cf. Middle Dutch vrisch "fresh," Old High German frisc "lively;" see fresh (adj.1)). Sense of "pat down in a search" first recorded 1781. Related: Frisked; frisking. As a noun from 1520s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for frisk

frisk

noun

: They did a quick frisk and let him go

verb

  1. (also frisk down) To search, esp for firearms or contraband, by patting or rubbing the person in places where these might be concealed: Raise your hands high, frisk him/ without getting taken-off, frisked-down or punched-out
  2. To inspect a building, apartment, etc, for evidence or loot: Let's go up and frisk the apartment (1781+)
The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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