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gaillard

[gal-yerd] /ˈgæl yərd/
noun
1.

galliard

or gaillard

[gal-yerd] /ˈgæl yərd/
noun
1.
a spirited dance for two dancers in triple rhythm, common in the 16th and 17th centuries.
Origin of galliard
1525-1535
1525-35; < Middle French gaillard, noun use of adj.: lively, vigorous (> Middle English gaillard, late Middle English galyarde), probably < Gallo-Romance *galia < Celtic (compare MIr gal warlike ardor, valor); see -ard
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for gaillard
Historical Examples
  • That Abreu rivals you in flavour, and that gaillard has not less invention.

    Tancred Benjamin Disraeli
  • The idol and delight of the nation (so-called by his historian, gaillard).

    Zanoni Edward Bulwer Lytton
  • Her baby had been left in Amiens, with a woman called gaillard.

    To Tell You the Truth Leonard Merrick
  • gaillard was a versatile fellow; he had been a poet, an actor, and a journalist.

    Robert Tournay William Sage
  • gaillard, who never forgot the favor, was devoted to his friend.

    Robert Tournay William Sage
  • "On this occasion all the precipitation was on the part of the tailor," replied gaillard.

    Robert Tournay William Sage
  • "All of them either friends or tools of Robespierre," was gaillard's comment.

    Robert Tournay William Sage
  • "My dear gaillard, I am a soldier and can eat anything," was Tournay's rejoinder.

    Robert Tournay William Sage
  • gaillard, your dinner is most excellent; your pet shall be safe.

    Robert Tournay William Sage
  • gaillard accompanied the two police officers to the other side of the street.

    Robert Tournay William Sage
British Dictionary definitions for gaillard

galliard

/ˈɡæljəd/
noun
1.
a spirited dance in triple time for two persons, popular in the 16th and 17th centuries
2.
a piece of music composed for this dance
adjective
3.
(archaic) lively; spirited
Word Origin
C14: from Old French gaillard valiant, perhaps of Celtic origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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