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giveaway

[giv-uh-wey]
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noun
  1. an act or instance of giving something away.
  2. something that is given away, especially as a gift or premium: A pocket calculator was offered as a giveaway with every new subscription to the magazine.
  3. a radio or television program on which prizes are given away to contestants in a question-and-answer game.
  4. a tax law or other legislation designed to benefit one segment of the population, one area or state, etc.: a giveaway that benefited only the very rich.
  5. an unscrupulous deal, especially one that benefits some while defrauding others.
  6. Sports. any careless loss of possession of a ball, puck, etc., or other offensive lapse that leads to a score by the opponent.
adjective
  1. constituting a giveaway: a giveaway newspaper.

Origin of giveaway

1870–75, Americanism; noun use of verb phrase give away
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for giveaway

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • Showing more than a normal interest would have been a giveaway.

    The K-Factor

    Harry Harrison (AKA Henry Maxwell Dempsey)

  • I almost halted in alarm, but that might have been a giveaway.

    The Old Die Rich

    Horace Leonard Gold

  • But in spite of the giveaway, Ingolby was getting them where they were soft-fairly drugging them with good news.

  • Only his hands were a giveaway; they were stained with yellow and black stains that looked completely out of place on the man.

    The Professional Approach

    Charles Leonard Harness

  • Even the way they shake whenever they come out of the mud is a giveaway—what better way to seed their crop far and wide?

    The Native Soil

    Alan Edward Nourse


Word Origin and History for giveaway

n.

also give-away, "act of giving away," 1872, from phrase give away, c.1400 (of brides, from 1719); meaning "to betray, expose, reveal" is 1878, originally U.S. slang.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper